The animosity between the Montagues and Capulets, was nothing to that which prevailed between these two illustrious houses.

Background.

Sketches by Boz

The animosity between the Montagues and Capulets, was nothing to that which prevailed between these two illustrious houses.” is a quotation from Sketches by BozTales. Chapter 7 (The Steam Excursion).

Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.

 

Context.

Description of animosity between the Briggses and the Tauntons.

The feud between the two households of the Montagues and the Capulets dominates the Shakespeare work Romeo and Juliet. Charles Dickens was a huge admirer of Shakespeare and would often pay homage to him in his own writings.

The quote is taken from the following passage in the sketch The Steam Excursion:

Wednesday evening arrived; eight o’clock came, and eight members of the committee were punctual in their attendance.  Mr. Loggins, the solicitor, of Boswell-court, sent an excuse, and Mr. Samuel Briggs, the ditto of Furnival’s Inn, sent his brother: much to his (the brother’s) satisfaction, and greatly to the discomfiture of Mr. Percy Noakes.  Between the Briggses and the Tauntons there existed a degree of implacable hatred, quite unprecedented.  The animosity between the Montagues and Capulets, was nothing to that which prevailed between these two illustrious houses.  Mrs. Briggs was a widow, with three daughters and two sons; Mr. Samuel, the eldest, was an attorney, and Mr. Alexander, the youngest, was under articles to his brother.  They resided in Portland-street, Oxford-street, and moved in the same orbit as the Tauntons—hence their mutual dislike.  If the Miss Briggses appeared in smart bonnets, the Miss Tauntons eclipsed them with smarter.  If Mrs. Taunton appeared in a cap of all the hues of the rainbow, Mrs. Briggs forthwith mounted a toque, with all the patterns of the kaleidoscope.  If Miss Sophia Taunton learnt a new song, two of the Miss Briggses came out with a new duet.  The Tauntons had once gained a temporary triumph with the assistance of a harp, but the Briggses brought three guitars into the field, and effectually routed the enemy.  There was no end to the rivalry between them.

Now, as Mr. Samuel Briggs was a mere machine, a sort of self-acting legal walking-stick; and as the party was known to have originated, however remotely, with Mrs. Taunton, the female branches of the Briggs family had arranged that Mr. Alexander should attend, instead of his brother; and as the said Mr. Alexander was deservedly celebrated for possessing all the pertinacity of a bankruptcy-court attorney, combined with the obstinacy of that useful animal which browses on the thistle, he required but little tuition.  He was especially enjoined to make himself as disagreeable as possible; and, above all, to black-ball the Tauntons at every hazard.

 

Have Your Say.

Give your view on “The animosity between the Montagues and Capulets, was nothing to that which prevailed between these two illustrious houses.” with a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars6 Stars7 Stars8 Stars9 Stars10 Stars (3 votes, average: 5.67 out of 10)
Loading...

 

Related.

If you like this, we think you might also be interested in these quotations:

 

Advertisements

,

Comments are closed.

Design: KavnMedia

Send this to a friend