The Circumlocution Office

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I always give too much to ladies. It’s a weakness of mine, and that’s the way I ruin myself.

Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol Quotations (Stave 4). I always give too much to ladies. It’s a weakness of mine, and that’s the way I ruin myself.

2019-11-11T19:17:11+00:00Categories: A Christmas Carol|Tags: , , |

Who’s the worse for the loss of a few things like these? Not a dead man, I suppose.

Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol Quotations (Stave 4). Who’s the worse for the loss of a few things like these? Not a dead man, I suppose.

2019-11-11T12:11:59+00:00Categories: A Christmas Carol|Tags: , |

Barely past her childhood, it required but a glance to discover that she was one of those children, born and bred in neglect and vice, who have never known what childhood is: who have never been taught to love and court a parent’s smile, or to dread a parent’s frown.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations (A Visit to Newgate). Barely past her childhood, it required but a glance to discover that she was one of those children, born and bred in neglect and vice, who have never known what childhood is: who have never been taught to love and court a parent’s smile, or to dread a parent’s frown.

A politico-diplomatic hocus pocus piece of machinery for the assistance of the nobs in keeping off the snobs.

Charles Dickens Little Dorrit Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 10). A politico-diplomatic hocus pocus piece of machinery for the assistance of the nobs in keeping off the snobs.

We must have humbug, we all like humbug, we couldn’t get on without humbug.

Charles Dickens Little Dorrit Quotations (Book 2, Chapter 28). We must have humbug, we all like humbug, we couldn’t get on without humbug.

The door of Scrooge’s counting-house was open that he might keep his eye upon his clerk, who in a dismal little cell beyond, a sort of tank, was copying letters.

Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol Quotations (Stave 1). The door of Scrooge’s counting-house was open that he might keep his eye upon his clerk, who in a dismal little cell beyond, a sort of tank, was copying letters.

2019-11-06T17:20:48+00:00Categories: A Christmas Carol|Tags: , |

Compounded some hot mixture in a jug with gin and lemons, and stirred it round and round and put it on the hob to simmer.

Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol Quotations (Stave 3). Compounded some hot mixture in a jug with gin and lemons, and stirred it round and round and put it on the hob to simmer.

2019-11-06T16:20:29+00:00Categories: A Christmas Carol|Tags: , , , , |

He was in a perspiration, and snorted and sniffed and puffed and blew, like a little labouring steam-engine.

Charles Dickens Little Dorrit Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 13). He was in a perspiration, and snorted and sniffed and puffed and blew, like a little labouring steam-engine.

2019-11-07T20:15:06+00:00Categories: Little Dorrit|Tags: |

A complexion that was very dingy by nature, or very dirty by art, or a compound of nature and art.

Charles Dickens Little Dorrit Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 13). A complexion that was very dingy by nature, or very dirty by art, or a compound of nature and art.

2019-11-04T18:22:13+00:00Categories: Little Dorrit|Tags: |

Gin-drinking is a great vice in England, but wretchedness and dirt are a greater; and until you improve the homes of the poor, or persuade a half-famished wretch not to seek relief in the temporary oblivion of his own misery, with the pittance which, divided among his family, would furnish a morsel of bread for each, gin-shops will increase in number and splendour.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations (Gin Shops). Gin-drinking is a great vice in England, but wretchedness and dirt are a greater; and until you improve the homes of the poor, or persuade a half-famished wretch not to seek relief in the temporary oblivion of his own misery, with the pittance which, divided among his family, would furnish a morsel of bread for each, gin-shops will increase in number and splendour.