Sam Weller

Poetry’s unnat’ral; no man ever talked poetry ‘cept a beadle on boxin’-day, or Warren’s blackin’, or Rowland’s oil, or some of them low fellows; never you let yourself down to talk poetry.

Background. "Poetry’s unnat’ral; no man ever talked poetry ‘cept a beadle on boxin’-day, or Warren’s blackin’, or Rowland’s oil, or some of them low fellows; never you let yourself down to talk poetry." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 33). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Quotation said by the character Sam Weller. Taken from the following [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:08+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

Tongue—, well that’s a wery good thing when it ain’t a woman’s.

Background. "Tongue—, well that’s a wery good thing when it ain’t a woman’s." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 19). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Quotation said by the character Sam Weller. Taken from the following passage of Chapter 19 of The Pickwick Papers: ‘Hold on, sir,’ said Mr. Weller, invigorated with the prospect of refreshments. [...]

2018-06-05T17:32:25+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , |

Avay vith melincholly, as the little boy said ven his schoolmissus died.

Background. "Avay vith melincholly, as the little boy said ven his schoolmissus died." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 44). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Taken from the following passage of Chapter 44 of The Pickwick Papers: Mr. Pickwick could scarcely forbear smiling, but managing to preserve his gravity, he drew forth the coin, and placed [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:05+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

I took a good deal o’ pains with his eddication, sir; let him run in the streets when he was wery young, and shift for hisself. It’s the only way to make a boy sharp, sir.

Background. "I took a good deal o’ pains with his eddication, sir; let him run in the streets when he was wery young, and shift for hisself. It’s the only way to make a boy sharp, sir." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 20). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. In this quotation, the character Sam Weller [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:05+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , |

It’s a wery remarkable circumstance, Sir, that poverty and oysters always seem to go together.

Background. "It’s a wery remarkable circumstance, Sir, that poverty and oysters always seem to go together." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 22). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. In this quotation, the character Sam Weller seems to have spotted a correlation between the number of stalls selling oysters in poorer areas. Taken from the following passages [...]

2018-08-10T06:16:58+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , |
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