Gin Shops

They are invariably numerous and splendid in precise proportion to the dirt and poverty of the surrounding neighbourhood.

Background. "They are invariably numerous and splendid in precise proportion to the dirt and poverty of the surrounding neighbourhood." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Scenes, Chapter 22 (Gin Shops). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Description of the gin-shops around St. Giles, one of the then poorest slums of London. Taken from the following passage in Gin Shops: The extensive scale on [...]

2018-08-17T06:59:29+00:00Categories: Gin Shops, Sketches by Boz|Tags: , |

A confused mixture of arms, legs, staves, torn coats, shouting, and struggling.

Background. "A confused mixture of arms, legs, staves, torn coats, shouting, and struggling." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Scenes, Chapter 22 (Gin Shops). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Description of a fight at a gin-shop. Taken from the following passage in Gin Shops: It is growing late, and the throng of men, women, and children, who have been constantly going in [...]

2018-08-17T06:57:02+00:00Categories: Gin Shops, Sketches by Boz|Tags: |

Carefully looking every way but the right one.

Background. "Carefully looking every way but the right one." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Scenes, Chapter 22 (Gin Shops). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.     Context. Description of a bar-maid at a gin-shop trying to avoid eye-contact with a flirtatious customer. Taken from the following passage in Gin Shops: The two old washerwomen, who are seated on the little bench to the [...]

2018-08-17T06:59:51+00:00Categories: Gin Shops, Sketches by Boz|Tags: |

A stout, coarse fellow in a fur cap, put on very much on one side to give him a knowing air, and to display his sandy whiskers to the best advantage.

Background. "A stout, coarse fellow in a fur cap, put on very much on one side to give him a knowing air, and to display his sandy whiskers to the best advantage." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Scenes, Chapter 22 (Gin Shops). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Description of the proprietor of a gin-shop. Taken from the following passage in Gin [...]

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