Great Expectations

You are viewing our collection of quotations taken from Great Expectations.


Great Expectations was the thirteenth novel from Victorian author Charles Dickens and first published between 1860 and 1861.

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My first most vivid and broad impression of the identity of things.

Background. "My first most vivid and broad impression of the identity of things." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 1). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation said the character Pip, as narrator, at the beginning of Great Expectations. Charles Dickens wrote Great Expectations in the first person, seen from Pip's point of view of his life. The novel is a Bildungsroman, a German term for an education or self-development novel. [...]

2018-08-11T16:27:35+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

Keep still, you little devil, or I’ll cut your throat!

Background. "Keep still, you little devil, or I’ll cut your throat!" is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 1). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation said the character Abel Magwitch to Pip at the beginning of Great Expectations. Pip has stumbled upon the escaped convict Magwitch whilst visiting the graves of his family in the local churchyard.  Magwitch startles Pip, and threatens him as seen here. Despite being scared by [...]

2018-08-11T16:18:46+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

Break their hearts my pride and hope, break their hearts and have no mercy!

Background. "Break their hearts my pride and hope, break their hearts and have no mercy!" is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 12). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation said by Miss Havisham to Estella, as recalled by Pip (the narrator of the novel). Miss Havisham is a wealthy spinster who was jilted at the altar, an act which has driven her to live a reclusive life. She lives in [...]

2018-09-11T12:18:20+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

You may be certain that I laugh because they fail.

Background. "You may be certain that I laugh because they fail." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 33). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation said by the character Estella who is talking to Pip. Estella shows her heartless attitude towards people, here explaining to Pip how she laughed at the misfortunes of visitors who came to see Miss Havisham. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 33 of Great Expectations: [...]

2018-08-03T14:33:14+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

In jail and out of jail, in jail and out of jail, in jail and out of jail.

Background. "In jail and out of jail, in jail and out of jail, in jail and out of jail." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 42). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation said by the character Abel Magwitch. The convict Abel Magwitch describes a short summary of his life to Pip. Taken from the following passage at the beginning of Chapter 42 of Great Expectations: “Dear boy and Pip’s [...]

2018-08-05T11:28:52+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

When I heard the Sunday bells, and looked around a little more upon the outspread beauty, I felt that I was not nearly thankful enough.

Background. "When I heard the Sunday bells, and looked around a little more upon the outspread beauty, I felt that I was not nearly thankful enough!" is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 57). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Pip reflects on his life and ungratitude. Having gained a fortune, and lost it along with a new circle of friends, he is taken back to the simplier days of his [...]

2018-09-09T17:23:11+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , , |

She put the mug down on the stones of the yard.

Background. "She put the mug down on the stones of the yard." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 8). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quote shows Estella's contempt towards Pip. Pip, the narrator and main character of Great Expectations has started to pay visits to the house of the reclusive Miss Havisham. There, he meets Miss Havisham's ward Estella, who he thinks is very pretty and seemed very [...]

2018-09-12T10:57:40+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , , |

The bellows seemed to roar for the fugitives.

Background. "The bellows seemed to roar for the fugitives." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 5). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Dickens shows Pip's fear of the forge. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 5 of Great Expectations: As I watched them while they all stood clustering about the forge, enjoying themselves so much, I thought what terrible good sauce for a dinner my fugitive friend on the marshes was. [...]

2018-04-30T15:18:44+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

I work pretty hard for a sufficient living.

Background. "There was a long hard time when I kept far from me the remembrance of what I had thrown away when I was quite ignorant of its worth." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 59). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quotation is said by Pip in a conversation with Estella at the end of the novel Great Expectations. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 59 of [...]

2018-05-02T10:24:03+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

Tell me of my ingratitude. Don’t be so good to me!

Background. "Tell me of my ingratitude. Don’t be so good to me!" is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 57). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Pip tells Joe to tell him how ungrateful he has been towards him. Pip, having lost his fortune and friends, is alone and feeling ill at his lodgings. He wakes to find his good-natured brother-in-law Joe Gargery has come to nurse him back to health, despite Pip [...]

2018-03-21T09:37:42+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |