Letters to Newspapers

Quotations from letters from Charles Dickens to newspapers.

They who are too ragged, wretched, filthy, and forlorn, to enter any other place: who could gain admission into no charity school, and who would be driven from any church door; are invited to come in here, and find some people not depraved, willing to teach them something, and show them some sympathy, and stretch a hand out, which is not the iron hand of Law, for their correction.

Background. "They who are too ragged, wretched, filthy, and forlorn, to enter any other place: who could gain admission into no charity school, and who would be driven from any church door; are invited to come in here, and find some people not depraved, willing to teach them something, and show them some sympathy, and stretch a hand out, which is not the iron hand of Law, for their correction" is a quotation from a Letter to The Daily News [...]

It was a hot summer night; and the air of Field Lane and Saffron Hill was not improved by such weather, nor were the people in those streets very sober or honest company.

Background. "It was a hot summer night; and the air of Field Lane and Saffron Hill was not improved by such weather, nor were the people in those streets very sober or honest company" is a quotation from a Letter to The Daily News (on the Field Lane Ragged School), written by Charles Dickens and published on 4 February, 1846.   Context. Charles Dickens was a supporter of the Field Lane Ragged School in the notorious Victorian London slum area [...]

2017-12-08T13:40:37+00:00Categories: Letters to Newspapers|Tags: , |

I have seen, habitually, some of the worst sources of general contamination and corruption in this country, and I think there are not many phases of London life that could surprise me.

Background. "I have seen, habitually, some of the worst sources of general contamination and corruption in this country, and I think there are not many phases of London life that could surprise me" is a quotation from a letter to The Times written by Charles Dickens (on the Manning execution at Horsemonger Lane Gaol), November 1849.   Context. Charles Dickens attended an execution at Horsemonger Lane Gaol on the morning of Tuesday 13th November 1849, staying all night to witness [...]

I stand astounded and appalled by the wickedness it exhibits.

Background. "I stand astounded and appalled by the wickedness it exhibits." is a quotation from a letter to The Times written by Charles Dickens (on the Manning execution at Horsemonger Lane Gaol), November 1849.   Context. Charles Dickens attended an execution at Horsemonger Lane Gaol on the morning of Tuesday, 13th November 1849, staying all night to witness the crowds gathering for the event. Maria and Frederick Manning were hanged on gallows erected on the flat roof of the prison’s gatehouse for [...]

2018-11-11T07:16:33+00:00Categories: Letters to Newspapers|Tags: , |
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