It’s likely to be a very cheap funeral, for upon my life I don’t know of anybody to go to it.

Background.

itemIt’s likely to be a very cheap funeral for upon my life I don’t know of anybody to go to it.” is a quotation taken from A Christmas Carol (Stave 4).

item A Christmas Carol is a novella, or short story, written by Charles Dickens and first published in the Christmas of 1843.

 

Context.

item The quote is said by some businessmen taking about the death of Ebenezer Scrooge who are joking about the lack of people likely to be at his funeral. The scene is set in the future and is shown to Ebenezer Scrooge by the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come.

item Taken from the following passage in Stave 4 (The Last Of The Three Spirits) of A Christmas Carol:

The Spirit stopped beside one little knot of business men. Observing that the hand was pointed to them, Scrooge advanced to listen to their talk.

“No,” said a great fat man with a monstrous chin, “I don’t know much about it, either way. I only know he’s dead.”

“When did he die?” inquired another.

“Last night, I believe.”

“Why, what was the matter with him?” asked a third, taking a vast quantity of snuff out of a very large snuff-box. “I thought he’d never die.”

“God knows,” said the first, with a yawn.

“What has he done with his money?” asked a red-faced gentleman with a pendulous excrescence on the end of his nose, that shook like the gills of a turkey-cock.

“I haven’t heard,” said the man with the large chin, yawning again. “Left it to his company, perhaps. He hasn’t left it to me. That’s all I know.”

This pleasantry was received with a general laugh.

It’s likely to be a very cheap funeral,” said the same speaker; “for upon my life I don’t know of anybody to go to it. Suppose we make up a party and volunteer?”

“I don’t mind going if a lunch is provided,” observed the gentleman with the excrescence on his nose. “But I must be fed, if I make one.”

Another laugh.

“Well, I am the most disinterested among you, after all,” said the first speaker, “for I never wear black gloves, and I never eat lunch. But I’ll offer to go, if anybody else will. When I come to think of it, I’m not at all sure that I wasn’t his most particular friend; for we used to stop and speak whenever we met. Bye, bye!”

Speakers and listeners strolled away, and mixed with other groups. Scrooge knew the men, and looked towards the Spirit for an explanation.

 

Have Your Say.

Give your view on “It’s likely to be a very cheap funeral for upon my life I don’t know of anybody to go to it.” with a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars6 Stars7 Stars8 Stars9 Stars10 Stars (4 votes, average: 6.00 out of 10)
Loading...

 

 

Related.

If you like this, we think you might also be interested in these related quotations:

 

Advertisements

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Design: KavnMedia

%d bloggers like this:

Send this to a friend