Bleak House

Quotations from the Charles Dickens novel Bleak House.

Dead, your Majesty. Dead, my lords and gentlemen. Dead, right reverends and wrong reverends of every order. Dead, men and women, born with heavenly compassion in your hearts. And dying thus around us every day.

Background. "Dead, your Majesty. Dead, my lords and gentlemen. Dead, right reverends and wrong reverends of every order. Dead, men and women, born with heavenly compassion in your hearts. And dying thus around us every day." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 47). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. This quotation is a harsh criticism on society by [...]

2017-12-08T13:04:53+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , , |

A good deal to say, chiefly in parentheses and without punctuation, but not much to tell.

Background. "A good deal to say, chiefly in parentheses and without punctuation, but not much to tell." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 11). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. Description of Mrs. Piper. Taken from the opening paragraph of Chapter 11 (Our Dear Brother) of Bleak House: Why, Mrs. Piper has a good deal to say, chiefly in [...]

2018-06-05T14:28:48+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: |

There were two classes of charitable people; one, the people who did a little and made a great deal of noise; the other, the people who did a great deal and made no noise at all.

Background. "There were two classes of charitable people; one, the people who did a little and made a great deal of noise; the other, the people who did a great deal and made no noise at all." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 8). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context.  Taken from the following passage in Chapter 8 (Covering [...]

2018-01-04T22:51:11+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

The weather is so very bad down in Lincolnshire that the liveliest imagination can scarcely apprehend its ever being fine again.

Background. "The weather is so very bad down in Lincolnshire that the liveliest imagination can scarcely apprehend its ever being fine again." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 7). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.     Context. Taken from the opening paragraph of Chapter 7 (The Ghost's Walk) of Bleak House: While Esther sleeps, and while Esther wakes, it is [...]

2018-01-04T22:47:37+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: |

The African project at present employs my whole time.

Background. "The African project at present employs my whole time." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 4). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 4 of Bleak House:  "You find me, my dears," said Mrs. Jellyby, snuffing the two great office candles in tin candlesticks, which made the room taste strongly of [...]

2018-07-15T17:58:20+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

I expect a judgment. Shortly.

Background. "I expect a judgment. Shortly." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 3). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.     Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 3 of Bleak House: When we got under the colonnade, Mr. Kenge remembered that he must go back for a moment to ask a question and left us in the fog, with [...]

2017-12-08T13:09:13+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

Most of the people I know would do far better to leave marriage alone. It is at the bottom of three fourths of their troubles.

Background. "Most of the people I know would do far better to leave marriage alone. It is at the bottom of three fourths of their troubles." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 41). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. This quotation is said by Mr. Tulkinghorn. Tulkinghorn is Sir Leicester Deadlock’s scheming and manipulative lawyer. Taken from the following passage [...]

2017-12-08T13:09:17+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: |

It is said that the children of the very poor are not brought up, but dragged up.

Background. "It is said that the children of the very poor are not brought up, but dragged up." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 6). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Have Your Say. Give your view on "It is said that the children of the very poor are not brought up, but dragged up." with a rating and help [...]

2018-03-04T07:42:07+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

Your sex have such a surprising animosity against one another when you do differ.

Background. "Your sex have such a surprising animosity against one another when you do differ." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 54). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.     Context. This is quotation is said by Mr. Bucket to Mademoiselle Hortense. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 54. "Bless you, darling," says Mr. Bucket with the greatest composure, "I'm [...]

2017-12-08T13:09:24+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: |

Keep out of Chancery…. It’s being ground to bits in a slow mill; it’s being roasted at a slow fire; it’s being stung to death by single bees; it’s being drowned by drops; it’s going mad by grains.

Background. "Keep out of Chancery.... It's being ground to bits in a slow mill; it's being roasted at a slow fire; it's being stung to death by single bees; it's being drowned by drops; it's going mad by grains" is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 5). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Have Your Say. Give your view on "Keep [...]

2017-12-08T13:23:08+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

Injustice breeds injustice.

Background. "Injustice breeds injustice." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 39). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 39 (Attorney and Client) of Bleak House: Richard, emerging from the heavy shade of Symond’s Inn into the sunshine of Chancery Lane—for there happens to be sunshine there to-day—walks thoughtfully on, and turns into Lincoln’s Inn, [...]

2018-07-21T19:13:47+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

The one great principle of the English law is, to make business for itself. There is no other principle distinctly, certainly, and consistently maintained through all its narrow turnings.

Background. "The one great principle of the English law is, to make business for itself. There is no other principle distinctly, certainly, and consistently maintained through all its narrow turnings" is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 39). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. This quotation is taken from the following passage in Chapter 39 (Attorney and Client) of [...]

2018-07-21T19:32:33+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , , |