Great Expectations

You are viewing our collection of quotations taken from Great Expectations.


Great Expectations was the thirteenth novel from Victorian author Charles Dickens and first published between 1860 and 1861.

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When I heard the Sunday bells, and looked around a little more upon the outspread beauty, I felt that I was not nearly thankful enough.

Background. "When I heard the Sunday bells, and looked around a little more upon the outspread beauty, I felt that I was not nearly thankful enough!" is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 57). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Pip reflects on his life and ungratitude. Having gained a fortune, and lost it along with a new circle of friends, he is taken back to the simplier days of his [...]

2018-04-30T12:26:56+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

She put the mug down on the stones of the yard.

Background. "She put the mug down on the stones of the yard." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 8). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quote shows Estella's contempt towards Pip. Pip, the narrator and main character of Great Expectations has started to pay visits to the house of Miss Havisham. There, he meets Miss Havisham's ward Estella, who he thinks is "very pretty and seemed very proud". Estella [...]

2018-05-16T11:44:52+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , , |

The bellows seemed to roar for the fugitives.

Background. "The bellows seemed to roar for the fugitives." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 5). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Dickens shows Pip's fear of the forge. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 5 of Great Expectations: As I watched them while they all stood clustering about the forge, enjoying themselves so much, I thought what terrible good sauce for a dinner my fugitive friend on the marshes was. [...]

2018-04-30T15:18:44+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

I work pretty hard for a sufficient living.

Background. "There was a long hard time when I kept far from me the remembrance of what I had thrown away when I was quite ignorant of its worth." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 59). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quotation is said by Pip in a conversation with Estella at the end of the novel Great Expectations. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 59 of [...]

2018-05-02T10:24:03+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

Tell me of my ingratitude. Don’t be so good to me!

Background. "Tell me of my ingratitude. Don’t be so good to me!" is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 57). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Pip tells Joe to tell him how ungrateful he has been towards him. Pip, having lost his fortune and friends, is alone and feeling ill at his lodgings. He wakes to find his good-natured brother-in-law Joe Gargery has come to nurse him back to health, despite Pip [...]

2018-03-21T09:37:42+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

This is a pretty pleasure-ground.

Background. "This is a pretty pleasure-ground." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 25). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quote is said by Wemmick's elderly father to Pip, who has arrived at Wemmick's strange hand-built house that resembles a small castle, complete with a drawbridge, canon and flagpole. Quotation taken from the following passage in Chapter 25 of Great Expectations: in which Pip arrives at Wemmick's house at Walworth [...]

2018-05-15T11:14:46+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

What have I done! What have I done! What have I done!

Background. "What have I done! What have I done! What have I done!" is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 49). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation said by Miss Havisham. Later on into the story of Great Expectations, Miss Havisham repents when Estella leaves to marry Pip's rival, Bentley Drummle and she realises that she has caused Pip’s heart to be broken in the same manner as her own. [...]

2018-04-15T21:26:38+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

I stole her heart away, and put ice in its place.

Background. "I stole her heart away, and put ice in its place." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 49). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.     Context. Quotation said by Miss Havisham. Later on into the story of Great Expectations, Miss Havisham repents when Estella leaves to marry Pip's rival, Bentley Drummle and she realises that she has caused Pip’s heart to be broken in the same manner as her own. [...]

2018-04-20T13:12:50+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

The dress had been put upon the rounded figure of a young woman, and that the figure upon which it now hung loose had shrunk to skin and bone.

Background. "The dress had been put upon the rounded figure of a young woman, and that the figure upon which it now hung loose had shrunk to skin and bone." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 8). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context.  In this quotation the character Pip describes the appearance of Miss Havisham upon first meeting her at her decaying mansion, Satis House. Havisham is sitting in her wedding dress, which [...]

2018-05-16T11:50:56+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

I never had one hour’s happiness in her society, and yet my mind all round the four-and-twenty hours was harping on the happiness of having her with me unto death.

Background. "I never had one hour's happiness in her society, and yet my mind all round the four-and-twenty hours was harping on the happiness of having her with me unto death." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 38). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation said by the character Pip, reflecting on his desire to spend time with Estella. Estella has been sent to live in the house of Mrs. [...]

2018-02-23T09:00:25+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

I began fully to know how wrecked I was.

Background. "I began fully to know how wrecked I was." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 39). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Pip reflects on how his ambitions have changed. he now finds himself harboring a wanted man, and his dreams of marrying Estella have been shattered. The quote comes at the end of Volume 2 of Great Expectations. Volume 2 started with Pip moving to London to start [...]

2018-05-10T20:02:48+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

He washed his clients off, as if he were a surgeon or a dentist.

Background. "He washed his clients off, as if he were a surgeon or a dentist." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 26). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quote describes an observation of the lawyer Jaggers by Pip about his constant need to wash his hands. The washing is symbolic of Jaggers washing off the deeds of his clients, or possibly his guilt at helping them. Dickens refers to [...]

2018-04-24T21:50:06+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , , , |