Archive | Nicholas Nickleby

Quotations from the Charles Dickens novel Nicholas Nickleby.

nicholas_nickleby

There was a literary gentleman present who had dramatised in his time two hundred and forty-seven novels as fast as they had come out—some of them faster than they had come out—and who was a literary gentleman in consequence.

Background. “There was a literary gentleman present who had dramatised in his time two hundred and forty-seven novels as fast as they had come out—some of them faster than they had come out—and who was a literary gentleman in consequence.” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 48). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, […]

Continue Reading

nicholas_nickleby

When I dramatise a book, sir, that’s fame. For its author.

Background. “When I dramatise a book, sir, that’s fame. For its author.” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 48). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Quotation said by a ‘literary gentleman’ who […]

Continue Reading

nicholas_nickleby

Shakespeare derived some of his plots from old tales and legends in general circulation; but it seems to me, that some of the gentlemen of your craft, at the present day, have shot very far beyond him.

Background. “Shakespeare derived some of his plots from old tales and legends in general circulation; but it seems to me, that some of the gentlemen of your craft, at the present day, have shot very far beyond him.” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 48). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly […]

Continue Reading

nicholas_nickleby

Show me the distinction between such pilfering as this, and picking a man’s pocket in the street: unless, indeed, it be, that the legislature has a regard for pocket-handkerchiefs, and leaves men’s brains, except when they are knocked out by violence, to take care of themselves.

Background. “Show me the distinction between such pilfering as this, and picking a man’s pocket in the street: unless, indeed, it be, that the legislature has a regard for pocket-handkerchiefs, and leaves men’s brains, except when they are knocked out by violence, to take care of themselves.” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 48). […]

Continue Reading

nicholas_nickleby

Gold conjures up a mist about a man.

Background. “Gold conjures up a mist about a man.” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 1). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 1 of Nicholas […]

Continue Reading

nicholas_nickleby

Bring in the bottled lightning, a clean tumbler, and a corkscrew.

Background. “Bring in the bottled lightning, a clean tumbler, and a corkscrew.” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 49). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Quotation said by the old ‘gentleman […]

Continue Reading

nicholas_nickleby

That sort of half-sigh, which, accompanied by two or three slight nods of the head, is pity’s small change in general society.

Background. “That sort of half-sigh, which, accompanied by two or three slight nods of the head, is pity’s small change in general society.” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 18). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between […]

Continue Reading

nicholas_nickleby

That particular part of Snow Hill where omnibus horses going eastward seriously think of falling down on purpose

Background. “That particular part of Snow Hill where omnibus horses going eastward seriously think of falling down on purpose.” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 4). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   […]

Continue Reading

nicholas_nickleby

It is a pleasant thing to see that the sun has been there; to know that the air and light are on them every day; to feel that they are children, and lead children’s lives; that if their pillows be damp, it is with the dews of Heaven, and not with tears; that the limbs of their girls are free, and that they are not crippled by distortions, imposing an unnatural and horrible penance upon their sex; that their lives are spent, from day to day, at least among the waving trees, and not in the midst of dreadful engines which make young children old before they know what childhood is, and give them the exhaustion and infirmity of age, without, like age, the privilege to die.

Background. “It is a pleasant thing to see that the sun has been there; to know that the air and light are on them every day; to feel that they are children, and lead children’s lives; that if their pillows be damp, it is with the dews of Heaven, and not with tears; that the […]

Continue Reading

nicholas_nickleby

Drinking-tents were full, glasses began to clink in carriages, hampers to be unpacked, tempting provisions to be set forth, knives and forks to rattle, champagne corks to fly, eyes to brighten that were not dull before, and pickpockets to count their gains during the last heat

Background. “Drinking-tents were full, glasses began to clink in carriages, hampers to be unpacked, tempting provisions to be set forth, knives and forks to rattle, champagne corks to fly, eyes to brighten that were not dull before, and pickpockets to count their gains during the last heat.” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 50). […]

Continue Reading

Design: KavnMedia

Send this to a friend