The Pickwick Papers

The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (1836), better known as The Pickwick Papers, is the first novel by Charles Dickens, containing a sequence of loosely-related adventures. The novel’s main character, Samuel Pickwick, Esquire, is a kind and wealthy old gentleman, and the founder and perpetual president of the Pickwick Club. To extend his researches into the quaint and curious phenomena of life, he suggests that he and three other “Pickwickians” (Mr Nathaniel Winkle, Mr Augustus Snodgrass, and Mr Tracy Tupman) should make journeys to places remote from London and report on their findings to the other members of the club.


 

 

She dotes on poetry… She adores it; I may say that her whole soul and mind are wound up, and entwined with it. She has produced some delightful pieces, herself… You may have met with her “Ode to an Expiring Frog,”.

Background. "She dotes on poetry... She adores it; I may say that her whole soul and mind are wound up, and entwined with it. She has produced some delightful pieces, herself... You may have met with her “Ode to an Expiring Frog,”." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 15). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Quotation said [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:09+00:00 Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

The beer has reminded me that I forgot.

Background. "The beer has reminded me that I forgot." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 48). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Quotation by Ben Allen who is talking to Bob Sawyer. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 48 of The Pickwick Papers: Mr. Ben Allen and Mr. Bob Sawyer sat together in the little surgery [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:09+00:00 Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

Leaving the business to take care of itself, as it seems to have made up its mind not to take care of me.

Background. "Leaving the business to take care of itself, as it seems to have made up its mind not to take care of me." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 50). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Quotation said by the character Bob Sawyer. In The Pickwick Papers, Robert "Bob" Sawyer is a medical student prone to drinking and [...]

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Poetry’s unnat’ral; no man ever talked poetry ‘cept a beadle on boxin’-day, or Warren’s blackin’, or Rowland’s oil, or some of them low fellows; never you let yourself down to talk poetry.

Background. "Poetry’s unnat’ral; no man ever talked poetry ‘cept a beadle on boxin’-day, or Warren’s blackin’, or Rowland’s oil, or some of them low fellows; never you let yourself down to talk poetry." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 33). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Quotation said by the character Sam Weller. Taken from the following [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:08+00:00 Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

Such are the narrow views of those philosophers who, content with examining the things that lie before them, look not to the truths which are hidden beyond.

Background. "Such are the narrow views of those philosophers who, content with examining the things that lie before them, look not to the truths which are hidden beyond." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 2). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 2 of The Pickwick Papers: That punctual servant of [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:07+00:00 Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

Poetry makes life what light and music do the stage.

Background. "Poetry makes life what light and music do the stage." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 3). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 3 of The Pickwick Papers: It was on this uncouth-looking person that Mr. Winkle’s eye rested, and it was towards him that Mr. Pickwick extended his [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:06+00:00 Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

I am ruminating on the strange mutability of human affairs.

Background. "I am ruminating on the strange mutability of human affairs." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 2). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 2 of The Pickwick Papers: Now it so happened that Mr. Pickwick and his three companions had resolved to make Rochester their first halting-place too; and [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:06+00:00 Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

Tongue—, well that’s a wery good thing when it ain’t a woman’s.

Background. "Tongue—, well that’s a wery good thing when it ain’t a woman’s." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 19). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Quotation said by the character Sam Weller. Taken from the following passage of Chapter 19 of The Pickwick Papers: ‘Hold on, sir,’ said Mr. Weller, invigorated with the prospect of refreshments. [...]

2018-06-05T17:32:25+00:00 Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , |

It wasn’t the wine, it was the salmon.

Background. "It wasn't the wine, it was the salmon." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 8). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Quotation said by the character Augustus Snodgrass. Taken from the following passage of Chapter 8 of The Pickwick Papers: Eleven—twelve—one o'clock had struck, and the gentlemen had not arrived. Consternation sat on every face. Could they [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:05+00:00 Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , |

Avay vith melincholly, as the little boy said ven his schoolmissus died.

Background. "Avay vith melincholly, as the little boy said ven his schoolmissus died." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 44). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Taken from the following passage of Chapter 44 of The Pickwick Papers: Mr. Pickwick could scarcely forbear smiling, but managing to preserve his gravity, he drew forth the coin, and placed [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:05+00:00 Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

I took a good deal o’ pains with his eddication, sir; let him run in the streets when he was wery young, and shift for hisself. It’s the only way to make a boy sharp, sir.

Background. "I took a good deal o’ pains with his eddication, sir; let him run in the streets when he was wery young, and shift for hisself. It’s the only way to make a boy sharp, sir." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 20). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. In this quotation, the character Sam Weller [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:05+00:00 Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , |

It’s a wery remarkable circumstance, Sir, that poverty and oysters always seem to go together.

Background. "It’s a wery remarkable circumstance, Sir, that poverty and oysters always seem to go together." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 22). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. In this quotation, the character Sam Weller seems to have spotted a correlation between the number of oysters stalls in poorer areas. Taken from the following passages in [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:04+00:00 Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , |