Background.

A man may call his house an island if he likes; there’s no act of Parliament against that, I believe?” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 7).

The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.

 

Context.

itemQuotation said by Wackford Squeers, the cruel schoolmaster who runs Dotheboys Hall.

Taken from the following passage in Chapter 7 of Nicholas Nickleby:

‘Is it much farther to Dotheboys Hall, sir?’ asked Nicholas.

‘About three mile from here,’ replied Squeers. ‘But you needn’t call it a Hall down here.’

Nicholas coughed, as if he would like to know why.

‘The fact is, it ain’t a Hall,’ observed Squeers drily.

‘Oh, indeed!’ said Nicholas, whom this piece of intelligence much astonished.

‘No,’ replied Squeers. ‘We call it a Hall up in London, because it sounds better, but they don’t know it by that name in these parts. A man may call his house an island if he likes; there’s no act of Parliament against that, I believe?

‘I believe not, sir,’ rejoined Nicholas.

 

 

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