My father’s family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip.

Background.

Great Expectations

itemMy father’s family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip.” is a quotation from the novel Great Expectations (Chapter 1).

item Great Expectations is Charles Dickens‘s thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.

 

Context.

item These are the opening lines of Great Expectations, introducing the character of Pip.

 

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Related.

item Click here to see more quotations related to Pip.

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