Nicholas Nickleby

Quotations from the Charles Dickens novel Nicholas Nickleby.

In the mass of white and upturned faces, the dying wretch, in his all-comprehensive look of agony, has met not one—not one—that bore the impress of pity or compassion.

Background. "In the mass of white and upturned faces, the dying wretch, in his all-comprehensive look of agony, has met not one—not one—that bore the impress of pity or compassion." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 4). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Description of an executed person at Newgate. Taken from the following passage in Chapter [...]

2018-08-16T13:04:53+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: , , |

A man may call his house an island if he likes; there’s no act of Parliament against that, I believe?

Background. "A man may call his house an island if he likes; there’s no act of Parliament against that, I believe?" is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 7). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Quotation said by Wackford Squeers, the cruel schoolmaster who runs Dotheboys Hall. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 7 of Nicholas Nickleby: [...]

2018-08-16T20:00:54+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: |

Every baby born into the world is a finer one than the last.

Background. "Every baby born into the world is a finer one than the last." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 36). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 36 of Nicholas Nickleby: Pondering upon the advisability of this step, and the sensation it was likely to create in the neighbourhood, Mr. [...]

2018-08-11T20:24:06+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: |

There was a literary gentleman present who had dramatised in his time two hundred and forty-seven novels as fast as they had come out—some of them faster than they had come out—and who was a literary gentleman in consequence.

Background. "There was a literary gentleman present who had dramatised in his time two hundred and forty-seven novels as fast as they had come out—some of them faster than they had come out—and who was a literary gentleman in consequence." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 48). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Quotation said by a [...]

2018-08-11T20:25:58+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: , |

When I dramatise a book, sir, that’s fame. For its author.

Background. "When I dramatise a book, sir, that’s fame. For its author." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 48). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Quotation said by a 'literary gentleman' who is talking to Nicholas Nickleby. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 48 of Nicholas Nickleby: It was upon the whole a very distinguished party, for [...]

2018-08-11T20:29:06+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: , |

Shakespeare derived some of his plots from old tales and legends in general circulation; but it seems to me, that some of the gentlemen of your craft, at the present day, have shot very far beyond him.

Background. "Shakespeare derived some of his plots from old tales and legends in general circulation; but it seems to me, that some of the gentlemen of your craft, at the present day, have shot very far beyond him." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 48). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Quotation said by Nicholas Nickleby, [...]

2018-08-11T20:31:11+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: , |

Show me the distinction between such pilfering as this, and picking a man’s pocket in the street: unless, indeed, it be, that the legislature has a regard for pocket-handkerchiefs, and leaves men’s brains, except when they are knocked out by violence, to take care of themselves.

Background. "Show me the distinction between such pilfering as this, and picking a man’s pocket in the street: unless, indeed, it be, that the legislature has a regard for pocket-handkerchiefs, and leaves men’s brains, except when they are knocked out by violence, to take care of themselves." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 48). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 [...]

2018-08-11T20:33:13+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: |

Gold conjures up a mist about a man.

Background. "Gold conjures up a mist about a man." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 1). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 1 of Nicholas Nickleby : On the death of his father, Ralph Nickleby, who had been some time before placed in a mercantile house in London, applied himself [...]

2018-07-21T19:43:22+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: |

Bring in the bottled lightning, a clean tumbler, and a corkscrew.

Background. "Bring in the bottled lightning, a clean tumbler, and a corkscrew." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 49). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Quotation said by the old 'gentleman in small-clothes', an eccentric neighbour of Mrs. Nickleby who is attempting to climb down the chimney. Having been stopped, he demands some very strong alcohol, [...]

2018-09-04T16:55:57+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: |

That sort of half-sigh, which, accompanied by two or three slight nods of the head, is pity’s small change in general society.

Background. "That sort of half-sigh, which, accompanied by two or three slight nods of the head, is pity’s small change in general society." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 18). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between

2018-02-23T19:49:07+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: , |