great_expectations

I never had one hour’s happiness in her society, and yet my mind all round the four-and-twenty hours was harping on the happiness of having her with me unto death.

Background. “I never had one hour’s happiness in her society, and yet my mind all round the four-and-twenty hours was harping on the happiness of having her with me unto death.” is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 38). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens‘s thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation […]

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nicholas_nickleby

There was a literary gentleman present who had dramatised in his time two hundred and forty-seven novels as fast as they had come out—some of them faster than they had come out—and who was a literary gentleman in consequence.

Background. “There was a literary gentleman present who had dramatised in his time two hundred and forty-seven novels as fast as they had come out—some of them faster than they had come out—and who was a literary gentleman in consequence.” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 48). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, […]

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nicholas_nickleby

When I dramatise a book, sir, that’s fame. For its author.

Background. “When I dramatise a book, sir, that’s fame. For its author.” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 48). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Quotation said by a ‘literary gentleman’ who […]

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nicholas_nickleby

Shakespeare derived some of his plots from old tales and legends in general circulation; but it seems to me, that some of the gentlemen of your craft, at the present day, have shot very far beyond him.

Background. “Shakespeare derived some of his plots from old tales and legends in general circulation; but it seems to me, that some of the gentlemen of your craft, at the present day, have shot very far beyond him.” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 48). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly […]

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nicholas_nickleby

Show me the distinction between such pilfering as this, and picking a man’s pocket in the street: unless, indeed, it be, that the legislature has a regard for pocket-handkerchiefs, and leaves men’s brains, except when they are knocked out by violence, to take care of themselves.

Background. “Show me the distinction between such pilfering as this, and picking a man’s pocket in the street: unless, indeed, it be, that the legislature has a regard for pocket-handkerchiefs, and leaves men’s brains, except when they are knocked out by violence, to take care of themselves.” is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 48). […]

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pickwickclub

She dotes on poetry… She adores it; I may say that her whole soul and mind are wound up, and entwined with it. She has produced some delightful pieces, herself… You may have met with her “Ode to an Expiring Frog,”.

Background. “She dotes on poetry… She adores it; I may say that her whole soul and mind are wound up, and entwined with it. She has produced some delightful pieces, herself… You may have met with her “Ode to an Expiring Frog,”.” is a quotation taken from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 15). The Posthumous Papers […]

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pickwickclub

The beer has reminded me that I forgot.

Background. “The beer has reminded me that I forgot.” is a quotation taken from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 48). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens‘s first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Quotation by Ben Allen who is talking to Bob […]

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pickwickclub

Poetry’s unnat’ral; no man ever talked poetry ‘cept a beadle on boxin’-day, or Warren’s blackin’, or Rowland’s oil, or some of them low fellows; never you let yourself down to talk poetry.

Background. “Poetry’s unnat’ral; no man ever talked poetry ‘cept a beadle on boxin’-day, or Warren’s blackin’, or Rowland’s oil, or some of them low fellows; never you let yourself down to talk poetry.” is a quotation taken from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 33). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as […]

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