if_there_be_one_thing_in_existence_more_miserable

If there be one thing in existence more miserable than another, it most unquestionably is the being compelled to rise by candlelight.

Background. “If there be one thing in existence more miserable than another, it most unquestionably is the being compelled to rise by candlelight.” is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Scenes, Chapter 15 (Early Coaches). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836. […]

Continue Reading

carried_to_their_respective_abodes

Carried to their respective abodes in a hackney-coach, and a state of insensibility, compounded of shrub, sherry, and excitement.

Background. “Carried to their respective abodes in a hackney-coach, and a state of insensibility, compounded of shrub, sherry, and excitement.” is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Characters. Chapter 4 (Miss Evans and the Eagle). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   […]

Continue Reading

ginger_beer_was_going_off_in_one_place

Ginger-beer was going off in one place, and practical jokes were going on in another.

Background. “Ginger-beer was going off in one place, and practical jokes were going on in another.” is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Characters. Chapter 4 (Miss Evans and the Eagle). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Description of the […]

Continue Reading

If any one were to ask me what in my opinion was the dullest and most stupid spot on the face of the Earth, I should decidedly say Chelmsford.

  Background. “If any one were to ask me what in my opinion was the dullest and most stupid spot on the face of the Earth, I should decidedly say Chelmsford.” is a quotation from a letter from Charles Dickens to Thomas Beard on 11 January, 1835. The letter was written from the Black Boy […]

Continue Reading

the_form_of_a_giantess

The form of a giantess and the mind of a child.

Background. “The form of a giantess and the mind of a child.” is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Tales. Chapter 7 (The Steam Excursion). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Description of Mrs. Taunton, the frivolous ‘good-looking widow of fifty’ […]

Continue Reading

sketchesbyboz

Mr. Edkins … makes a speech on every occasion on which a speech can possibly be made: the eloquence of which can only be equalled by its length. In the event of his not being previously appointed to a judgeship, it is probable that he will practise as a barrister in the New Central Criminal Court.

Background. “Mr. Edkins … makes a speech on every occasion on which a speech can possibly be made: the eloquence of which can only be equalled by its length. In the event of his not being previously appointed to a judgeship, it is probable that he will practise as a barrister in the New Central […]

Continue Reading

sketchesbyboz

He had a large circle of acquaintance, and seldom dined at his own expense.

Background. “He had a large circle of acquaintance, and seldom dined at his own expense.” is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Tales. Chapter 7 (The Steam Excursion). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Description of Percy Noakes, the law […]

Continue Reading

the_theatre_was_capacious

The Theatre was capacious, with a very large capable stage, well lighted, well appointed, and managed in a business-like, orderly manner in all respects.

Background. “The Theatre was capacious, with a very large capable stage, well lighted, well appointed, and managed in a business-like, orderly manner in all respects.” is a quotation from The Amusements of the People (Part 2).  The Amusements of the People was an article, written by Charles Dickens, exploring popular theatre. It was first published […]

Continue Reading

we_believe_a_love_of_dramatic_representations

We believe a love of dramatic representations to be an inherent principle in human nature.

Background. “We believe a love of dramatic representations to be an inherent principle in human nature.” is a quotation from The Amusements of the People (Part 2).  The Amusements of the People was an article, written by Charles Dickens, exploring popular theatre. It was first published in Dickens own weekly magazine Household Words on 30 […]

Continue Reading

a_great_many_very_young_girls

A great many very young girls grown into bold women before they had well ceased to be children.

Background. “A great many very young girls grown into bold women before they had well ceased to be children.” is a quotation from The Amusements of the People (Part 2).  The Amusements of the People was an article, written by Charles Dickens, exploring popular theatre. It was first published in Dickens own weekly magazine Household Words […]

Continue Reading

When I heard the Sunday bells, and looked around a little more upon the outspread beauty, I felt that I was not nearly thankful enough.

Background. “When I heard the Sunday bells, and looked around a little more upon the outspread beauty, I felt that I was not nearly thankful enough!” is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 57). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens‘s thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Pip reflects on his life and […]

Continue Reading

She put the mug down on the stones of the yard.

Background. “She put the mug down on the stones of the yard.” is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 8). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens‘s thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.     Context. This quote shows Estella’s contempt towards Pip. Pip, the narrator and main character of Great Expectations has started to […]

Continue Reading

Design: KavnMedia

%d bloggers like this:

Send this to a friend