Barnaby Rudge

Quotations from the Charles Dickens novel Barnaby Rudge.

Barnaby Rudge: A Tale of the Riots of Eighty published in 1841, was Charles Dickens’ first attempt at a historical novel, set during the Gordon Riots of 1780. It was one of two Dickens novels published in his short-lived weekly serial Master Humphrey’s Clock. Barnaby Rudge was originally planned to be his first published novel, but changes by the publisher led to extended delays, which caused it to be his fifth published novel.

Barnaby knew that the jail was a dull, sad, miserable place, and looked forward to tomorrow, as to a passage from it to something bright and beautiful.

Charles Dickens Barnaby Rudge Quotations (Chapter 76). Barnaby knew that the jail was a dull, sad, miserable place, and looked forward to tomorrow, as to a passage from it to something bright and beautiful.

2020-05-15T16:13:28+01:00Categories: Barnaby Rudge|Tags: , , |

The man glanced at the parish-clerk, whose air of consciousness and importance plainly betokened him to be the person referred to.

Charles Dickens Barnaby Rudge Quotations (Chapter 1). The man glanced at the parish-clerk, whose air of consciousness and importance plainly betokened him to be the person referred to.

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The negligence and disorder of the whole man, with something fierce and sullen in his features, gave him a picturesque appearance.

Charles Dickens Barnaby Rudge Quotations (Chapter 11). The negligence and disorder of the whole man, with something fierce and sullen in his features, gave him a picturesque appearance.

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To surround anything, however monstrous or ridiculous, with an air of mystery, is to invest it with a secret charm, and power of attraction which to the crowd is irresistible.

Charles Dickens Barnaby Rudge Quotations (Chapter 37). To surround anything, however monstrous or ridiculous, with an air of mystery, is to invest it with a secret charm, and power of attraction which to the crowd is irresistible.

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I don’t say half I mean. I can’t. I haven’t got the gift. There are talkers enough among us; I’ll be one of the doers.

Charles Dickens Barnaby Rudge Quotations (Chapter 40). I don’t say half I mean. I can’t. I haven’t got the gift. There are talkers enough among us; I’ll be one of the doers.

2019-06-18T20:31:30+01:00Categories: Barnaby Rudge|Tags: |

A lady of what is commonly called an uncertain temper—a phrase which being interpreted signifies a temper tolerably certain to make everybody more or less uncomfortable.

Charles Dickens Barnaby Rudge Quotations (Chapter 7). A lady of what is commonly called an uncertain temper—a phrase which being interpreted signifies a temper...

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The sergeant was describing a military life. It was all drinking, he said, except that there were frequent intervals of eating and love-making.

Charles Dickens Barnaby Rudge Quotations (Chapter 31). The sergeant was describing a military life. It was all drinking, he said, except that there were frequent intervals of eating and love-making.

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He melts, I think. He goes like a drop of froth. You look at him, and there he is. You look at him again, and – there he isn’t.

Charles Dickens Barnaby Rudge Quotations (Chapter 10). He melts, I think. He goes like a drop of froth. You look at him, and there he is. You look at him again, and - there he isn’t.

2019-06-18T20:27:41+01:00Categories: Barnaby Rudge|Tags: |