Little Dorrit

You are viewing our collection of quotations taken from Little Dorrit.


Little Dorrit was the eleventh novel from Charles Dickens, serialised between 1855 and 1857. A rags to riches story set in the 1820’s, Little Dorrit centres around the changing fortunes of the Dorrit family.

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A politico-diplomatic hocus pocus piece of machinery for the assistance of the nobs in keeping off the snobs.

Charles Dickens Little Dorrit Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 10). A politico-diplomatic hocus pocus piece of machinery for the assistance of the nobs in keeping off the snobs.

We must have humbug, we all like humbug, we couldn’t get on without humbug.

Charles Dickens Little Dorrit Quotations (Book 2, Chapter 28). We must have humbug, we all like humbug, we couldn’t get on without humbug.

He was in a perspiration, and snorted and sniffed and puffed and blew, like a little labouring steam-engine.

Charles Dickens Little Dorrit Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 13). He was in a perspiration, and snorted and sniffed and puffed and blew, like a little labouring steam-engine.

2019-11-07T20:15:06+00:00Categories: Little Dorrit|Tags: |

A complexion that was very dingy by nature, or very dirty by art, or a compound of nature and art.

Charles Dickens Little Dorrit Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 13). A complexion that was very dingy by nature, or very dirty by art, or a compound of nature and art.

2019-11-04T18:22:13+00:00Categories: Little Dorrit|Tags: |

There are people who have no human heart, and who must be crushed like savage beasts and cleared out of the way.

Charles Dickens Little Dorrit Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 11). There are people who have no human heart, and who must be crushed like savage beasts and cleared out of the way.

As number one referred him to number two, and as number two referred him to number three, he had occasion to state it three times before they all referred him to number four, to whom he stated it again.

Charles Dickens Little Dorrit Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 10). As number one referred him to number two, and as number two referred him to number three, he had occasion to state it three times before they all referred him to number four, to whom he stated it again.

The Circumlocution Office went on mechanically, every day, keeping this wonderful, all-sufficient wheel of statesmanship, How not to do it, in motion.

Charles Dickens Little Dorrit Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 10). The Circumlocution Office went on mechanically, every day, keeping this wonderful, all-sufficient wheel of statesmanship, How not to do it, in motion.

He wound and wound folds of white cravat round his neck, as he wound and wound folds of tape and paper round the neck of the country.

Charles Dickens Little Dorrit Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 10). He wound and wound folds of white cravat round his neck, as he wound and wound folds of tape and paper round the neck of the country.

No public business of any kind could possibly be done at any time without the acquiescence of the Circumlocution Office. Its finger was in the largest public pie, and in the smallest public tart. It was equally impossible to do the plainest right and to undo the plainest wrong without the express authority of the Circumlocution Office.

No public business of any kind could possibly be done at any time without the acquiescence of the Circumlocution Office. Its finger was in the largest public pie, and in the smallest public tart. It was equally impossible to do the plainest right and to undo the plainest wrong without the express authority of the Circumlocution Office.

It being one of the principles of the Circumlocution Office never, on any account whatever, to give a straightforward answer.

It being one of the principles of the Circumlocution Office never, on any account whatever, to give a straightforward answer.

The Department is accessible to the Public, if the Public approaches it according to the official forms; if the Public does not approach it according to the official forms, the Public has itself to blame.

Charles Dickens Little Dorrit Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 10). The Department is accessible to the Public, if the Public approaches it according to the official forms; if the Public does not approach it according to the official forms, the Public has itself to blame.