Sketches by Boz

Between 1833 and 1836, the Victorian writer Charles Dickens wrote a number of sketches which were originally published in various newspapers and other periodicals including The Morning Chronicle, The Evening Chronicle, The Monthly Magazine, The Carlton Chronicle and Bell’s Weekly Messenger. Many were published under the pen name of Boz, which Dickens adopted early on in his career as a writer and journalist. The popular sketches were reproduced in 1836 in a collected work, Sketches by Boz, which contained 56 sketches divided into four sections: Our Parish (7 sketches) Scenes (25 sketches), Characters (12 sketches) and Tales (12 sketches). The material in the first three sections consists of portraits of London life and the last section comprised fictional stories.

The field was filled with competitors for the vacant office, each of whom rested his claims to public support, entirely on the number and extent of his family, as if the office of beadle were originally instituted as an encouragement for the propagation of the human species.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations (The Election for Beadle). The field was filled with competitors for the vacant office, each of whom rested his claims to public support, entirely on the number and extent of his family, as if the office of beadle were originally instituted as an encouragement for the propagation of the human species.

Two coaches for the old ladies, the greater portion of whom, owing to the captain’s impetuosity, were driven up to the poll and home again, before they recovered from their flurry sufficiently to know, with any degree of clearness, what they had been doing.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations (The Election for Beadle). Two coaches for the old ladies, the greater portion of whom, owing to the captain’s impetuosity, were driven up to the poll and home again, before they recovered from their flurry sufficiently to know, with any degree of clearness, what they had been doing.

A determined opponent of the constituted authorities, whoever they may chance to be.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations (The Election for Beadle). A determined opponent of the constituted authorities, whoever they may chance to be.

The girl started up, with an energy quite preternatural; the fire gleamed in her heavy eyes, and the blood rushed to her pale and sunken cheeks.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. The girl started up, with an energy quite preternatural; the fire gleamed in her heavy eyes, and the blood rushed to her pale and sunken cheeks.

If there be one thing in existence more miserable than another, it most unquestionably is the being compelled to rise by candlelight.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. If there be one thing in existence more miserable than another, it most unquestionably is the being compelled to rise by candlelight.

2019-04-16T21:44:36+01:00Categories: Early Coaches, Sketches by Boz|Tags: |

Carried to their respective abodes in a hackney-coach, and a state of insensibility, compounded of shrub, sherry, and excitement.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. Carried to their respective abodes in a hackney-coach, and a state of insensibility, compounded of shrub, sherry, and excitement.

Ginger-beer was going off in one place, and practical jokes were going on in another.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. Ginger-beer was going off in one place, and practical jokes were going on in another.

He had a large circle of acquaintance, and seldom dined at his own expense.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. He had a large circle of acquaintance, and seldom dined at his own expense.