Sketches by Boz

Between 1833 and 1836, the Victorian writer Charles Dickens wrote a number of sketches which were originally published in various newspapers and other periodicals including The Morning Chronicle, The Evening Chronicle, The Monthly Magazine, The Carlton Chronicle and Bell’s Weekly Messenger. Many were published under the pen name of Boz, which Dickens adopted early on in his career as a writer and journalist. The popular sketches were reproduced in 1836 in a collected work, Sketches by Boz, which contained 56 sketches divided into four sections: Our Parish (7 sketches) Scenes (25 sketches), Characters (12 sketches) and Tales (12 sketches). The material in the first three sections consists of portraits of London life and the last section comprised fictional stories.

Did you ever see a countenance so expressive of the most hopeless extreme of heavy dulness.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. Did you ever see a countenance so expressive of the most hopeless extreme of heavy dulness.

It is a dreadful thing to wait and watch for the approach of death; to know that hope is gone, and recovery impossible; and to sit and count the dreary hours through long, long nights – such nights as only watchers by the bed of sickness know.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. It is a dreadful thing to wait and watch for the approach of death; to know that hope is gone, and recovery impossible; and to sit and count the dreary hours through long, long nights – such nights as only watchers by the bed of sickness know.

The heat is intense this afternoon, and the people, of whom there are additional parties arriving every moment, look as warm as the tables which have been recently painted, and have the appearance of being red-hot.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. The heat is intense this afternoon, and the people, of whom there are additional parties arriving every moment, look as warm as the tables which have been recently painted, and have the appearance of being red-hot.

2019-04-16T22:09:04+01:00Categories: Sketches by Boz|Tags: , |

The wish of persons in the humbler classes of life, to ape the manners and customs of those whom fortune has placed above them, is often the subject of remark, and not unfrequently of complaint.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. The wish of persons in the humbler classes of life, to ape the manners and customs of those whom fortune has placed above them, is often the subject of remark, and not unfrequently of complaint.

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The civility which money will purchase, is rarely extended to those who have none.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. The civility which money will purchase, is rarely extended to those who have none.

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The dignity of his office is never impaired by the absence of efforts on his part to maintain it.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. The dignity of his office is never impaired by the absence of efforts on his part to maintain it.

2019-04-16T22:21:09+01:00Categories: Sketches by Boz|Tags: |

Drunkenness – that fierce rage for the slow, sure poison, that oversteps every other consideration; that casts aside wife, children, friends, happiness, and station; and hurries its victims madly on to degradation and death.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. Drunkenness – that fierce rage for the slow, sure poison, that oversteps every other consideration; that casts aside wife, children, friends, happiness, and station; and hurries its victims madly on to degradation and death.

The appearance presented by the streets of London an hour before sunrise, on a summer’s morning, is most striking even to the few whose unfortunate pursuits of pleasure, or scarcely less unfortunate pursuits of business, cause them to be well acquainted with the scene.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. The appearance presented by the streets of London an hour before sunrise, on a summer’s morning, is most striking even to the few whose unfortunate pursuits of pleasure, or scarcely less unfortunate pursuits of business, cause them to be well acquainted with the scene.

There is a great deal of form, but no compassion; considerable interest, but no sympathy.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. There is a great deal of form, but no compassion; considerable interest, but no sympathy.

2019-04-16T22:26:12+01:00Categories: Sketches by Boz|Tags: , |

How dreadful its rough heavy walls, and low massive doors, appeared to us – the latter looking as if they were made for the express purpose of letting people in, and never letting them out again.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. How dreadful its rough heavy walls, and low massive doors, appeared to us – the latter looking as if they were made for the express purpose of letting people in, and never letting them out again.

2019-04-16T22:25:35+01:00Categories: Sketches by Boz|Tags: , |

He parted his hair on the centre of his forehead in the form of a Norman arch.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. He parted his hair on the centre of his forehead in the form of a Norman arch.