Sketches by Boz

Between 1833 and 1836, the Victorian writer Charles Dickens wrote a number of sketches which were originally published in various newspapers and other periodicals including The Morning Chronicle, The Evening Chronicle, The Monthly Magazine, The Carlton Chronicle and Bell’s Weekly Messenger. Many were published under the pen name of Boz, which Dickens adopted early on in his career as a writer and journalist. The popular sketches were reproduced in 1836 in a collected work, Sketches by Boz, which contained 56 sketches divided into four sections: Our Parish (7 sketches) Scenes (25 sketches), Characters (12 sketches) and Tales (12 sketches). The material in the first three sections consists of portraits of London life and the last section comprised fictional stories.

A stout, coarse fellow in a fur cap, put on very much on one side to give him a knowing air, and to display his sandy whiskers to the best advantage.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations (Gin Shops). A stout, coarse fellow in a fur cap, put on very much on one side to give him a knowing air, and to display his sandy whiskers to the best advantage.

The arrivals increase in number, and the heat and noise increase in very unpleasant proportion.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. The arrivals increase in number, and the heat and noise increase in very unpleasant proportion.

That wretched woman with the infant in her arms, round whose meagre form the remnant of her own scanty shawl is carefully wrapped, has been attempting to sing some popular ballad, in the hope of wringing a few pence from the compassionate passer-by.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. That wretched woman with the infant in her arms, round whose meagre form the remnant of her own scanty shawl is carefully wrapped, has been attempting to sing some popular ballad, in the hope of wringing a few pence from the compassionate passer-by.

The stranger who finds himself in ‘The Dials’ for the first time, and stands Belzoni-like, at the entrance of seven obscure passages, uncertain which to take, will see enough around him to keep his curiosity and attention awake for no inconsiderable time.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. The stranger who finds himself in ‘The Dials’ for the first time, and stands Belzoni-like, at the entrance of seven obscure passages, uncertain which to take, will see enough around him to keep his curiosity and attention awake for no inconsiderable time.

2019-04-16T22:05:46+01:00Categories: Sketches by Boz|Tags: |

The streets and courts dart in all directions, until they are lost in the unwholesome vapour which hangs over the house-tops, and renders the dirty perspective uncertain and confined; and lounging at every corner, as if they came there to take a few gasps of such fresh air as has found its way so far, but is too much exhausted already, to be enabled to force itself into the narrow alleys around.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. The streets and courts dart in all directions, until they are lost in the unwholesome vapour which hangs over the house-tops, and renders the dirty perspective uncertain and confined; and lounging at every corner, as if they came there to take a few gasps of such fresh air as has found its way so far, but is too much exhausted already, to be enabled to force itself into the narrow alleys around.

2019-04-16T22:06:27+01:00Categories: Sketches by Boz|Tags: |

They have within themselves, the materials of comfort and content; and the only anxiety of each, is to die before the other.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. They have within themselves, the materials of comfort and content; and the only anxiety of each, is to die before the other.

2019-04-16T22:06:44+01:00Categories: Sketches by Boz|

Telescopes, sandwiches, and glasses of brandy-and-water cold without, begin to be in great requisition.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. Telescopes, sandwiches, and glasses of brandy-and-water cold without, begin to be in great requisition.

The children are tired, and amuse themselves and the company generally by crying, or resort to the much more pleasant expedient of going to sleep.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. The children are tired, and amuse themselves and the company generally by crying, or resort to the much more pleasant expedient of going to sleep.

2019-04-16T22:07:44+01:00Categories: Sketches by Boz|Tags: |

Every woman in ‘the gardens,’ who has been married for any length of time, must have had twins on two or three occasions; it is impossible to account for the extent of juvenile population in any other way.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. Every woman in ‘the gardens,’ who has been married for any length of time, must have had twins on two or three occasions; it is impossible to account for the extent of juvenile population in any other way.

2019-04-16T22:07:58+01:00Categories: Sketches by Boz|Tags: |

Did you ever see a countenance so expressive of the most hopeless extreme of heavy dulness.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. Did you ever see a countenance so expressive of the most hopeless extreme of heavy dulness.

It is a dreadful thing to wait and watch for the approach of death; to know that hope is gone, and recovery impossible; and to sit and count the dreary hours through long, long nights – such nights as only watchers by the bed of sickness know.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. It is a dreadful thing to wait and watch for the approach of death; to know that hope is gone, and recovery impossible; and to sit and count the dreary hours through long, long nights – such nights as only watchers by the bed of sickness know.

The heat is intense this afternoon, and the people, of whom there are additional parties arriving every moment, look as warm as the tables which have been recently painted, and have the appearance of being red-hot.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. The heat is intense this afternoon, and the people, of whom there are additional parties arriving every moment, look as warm as the tables which have been recently painted, and have the appearance of being red-hot.