The Pickwick Papers

The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club (1836), better known as The Pickwick Papers, is the first novel by Charles Dickens, containing a sequence of loosely-related adventures. The novel’s main character, Samuel Pickwick, Esquire, is a kind and wealthy old gentleman, and the founder and perpetual president of the Pickwick Club. To extend his researches into the quaint and curious phenomena of life, he suggests that he and three other “Pickwickians” (Mr Nathaniel Winkle, Mr Augustus Snodgrass, and Mr Tracy Tupman) should make journeys to places remote from London and report on their findings to the other members of the club.


She dotes on poetry… She adores it; I may say that her whole soul and mind are wound up, and entwined with it. She has produced some delightful pieces, herself… You may have met with her “Ode to an Expiring Frog,”.

She dotes on poetry... She adores it; I may say that her whole soul and mind are wound up, and entwined with it. She has produced some delightful pieces, herself... You may have met with her “Ode to an Expiring Frog,”.

2019-01-07T17:09:06+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

There is a box of barristers on their right hand; there is an enclosure of insolvent debtors on their left; and there is an inclined plane of most especially dirty faces in their front.

There is a box of barristers on their right hand; there is an enclosure of insolvent debtors on their left; and there is an inclined plane of most especially dirty faces in their front.

2019-01-07T17:03:42+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

A double tier of bedroom galleries, with old clumsy balustrades, ran round two sides of the straggling area, and a double row of bells to correspond, sheltered from the weather by a little sloping roof, hung over the door leading to the bar and coffee-room.

A double tier of bedroom galleries, with old clumsy balustrades, ran round two sides of the straggling area, and a double row of bells to correspond, sheltered from the weather by a little sloping roof, hung over the door leading to the bar and coffee-room.

2019-01-07T16:51:36+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

Mr Jackson struck his forefinger several times against the left side of his nose, to intimate that he was not there to disclose the secrets of the prison house.

Mr Jackson struck his forefinger several times against the left side of his nose, to intimate that he was not there to disclose the secrets of the prison house.

2019-01-07T16:51:19+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , , |

When a man bleeds inwardly, it is a dangerous thing for himself; but when he laughs inwardly, it bodes no good to other people.

When a man bleeds inwardly, it is a dangerous thing for himself; but when he laughs inwardly, it bodes no good to other people.

2019-01-07T16:51:37+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

We still leave unblotted in the leaves of our statute book, for the reverence and admiration of successive ages, the just and wholesome law which declares that the sturdy felon shall be fed and clothed, and that the penniless debtor shall be left to die of starvation and nakedness. This is no fiction.

We still leave unblotted in the leaves of our statute book, for the reverence and admiration of successive ages, the just and wholesome law which declares that the sturdy felon shall be fed and clothed, and that the penniless debtor shall be left to die of starvation and nakedness. This is no fiction.

2019-01-07T16:51:36+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , , , |

These sequestered nooks are the public offices of the legal profession, where writs are issued, judgments signed, declarations filed, and numerous other ingenious machines put in motion for the torture and torment of His Majesty’s liege subjects, and the comfort and emolument of the practitioners of the law.

These sequestered nooks are the public offices of the legal profession, where writs are issued, judgments signed, declarations filed, and numerous other ingenious machines put in motion for the torture and torment of His Majesty’s liege subjects, and the comfort and emolument of the practitioners of the law.

2019-01-07T16:51:50+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , |

Lawyers hold that there are two kinds of particularly bad witnesses – a reluctant witness, and a too-willing witness.

Lawyers hold that there are two kinds of particularly bad witnesses – a reluctant witness, and a too-willing witness.

2019-01-07T16:51:51+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |