Short Works

The darkness was so profound, that looking into it was painful and oppressive.

Background. "The darkness was so profound, that looking into it was painful and oppressive." is a quotation from The Wreck of the Golden Mary. The Wreck of the Golden Mary was a short story by the Victorian author Charles Dickens about a terrifying ordeal of the passengers when the ship Golden Mary collides with an iceberg.   Context. This quotation is taken from the following passage in The Wreck of the Golden Mary: I had thought it impossible that it could be [...]

2017-12-08T13:09:39+00:00 Categories: The Wreck of the Golden Mary|Tags: |

O let us love our occupations, Bless the squire and his relations, Live upon our daily rations, And always know our proper stations.

Background. "O let us love our occupations, Bless the squire and his relations, Live upon our daily rations, And always know our proper stations." is a quotation from The Chimes (Chapter 2, Second Quarter). The Chimes is a short story written by Charles Dickens and first published in the Christmas of 1844.   Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 2 (Second Quarter) of The Chimes: ‘What man can do, I do,’ pursued Sir Joseph.  ‘I do my duty as the [...]

2018-05-16T09:07:43+00:00 Categories: The Chimes|Tags: , |

When men unnaturally fight against their own countrymen, they are always observed to be more unnaturally cruel and filled with rage than they are against any other enemy.

Background. "When men unnaturally fight against their own countrymen, they are always observed to be more unnaturally cruel and filled with rage than they are against any other enemy" is a quotation from the Charles Dickens book A Child's History of England, Chapter 22 (England under Henry the Sixth: Part the Third). A Child's History of England is a historical work by Charles Dickens. It first appeared in serial form in the periodical Household Words, running from January 25, 1851 [...]

2018-04-15T20:58:15+00:00 Categories: A Child's History of England|Tags: |

Some became Crusaders for the love of change; some, in the hope of plunder; some, because they had nothing to do at home; some, because they did what the priests told them; some, because they liked to see foreign countries; some, because they were fond of knocking men about, and would as soon knock a Turk about as a Christian.

Background. "Some became Crusaders for the love of change; some, in the hope of plunder; some, because they had nothing to do at home; some, because they did what the priests told them; some, because they liked to see foreign countries; some, because they were fond of knocking men about, and would as soon knock a Turk about as a Christian" is a quotation from the Charles Dickens book A Child's History of England, Chapter 9 (England under William II [...]

2018-04-15T20:57:21+00:00 Categories: A Child's History of England|Tags: |

The Fire was a great blessing to the City afterwards, for it arose from its ruins very much improved — built more regularly, more widely, more cleanly and carefully, and therefore much more healthily.

Background. "The Fire was a great blessing to the City afterwards, for it arose from its ruins very much improved — built more regularly, more widely, more cleanly and carefully, and therefore much more healthily" is a quotation from the Charles Dickens book A Child's History of England, Chapter 35 (England under Charles the Second, Called the Merry Monarch). A Child's History of England is a historical work by Charles Dickens. It first appeared in serial form in the periodical [...]

2018-04-15T20:56:43+00:00 Categories: A Child's History of England|Tags: |

Nothing can make war otherwise than horrible.

Background. "Nothing can make war otherwise than horrible" is a quotation from the Charles Dickens book A Child's History of England, Chapter 21 (England under Henry the Fifth: First Part). A Child's History of England is a historical work by Charles Dickens. It first appeared in serial form in the periodical Household Words, running from January 25, 1851 to December 10, 1853.   Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 21 (England under Henry the Fifth) of A Child's History [...]

2018-04-15T20:55:33+00:00 Categories: A Child's History of England|Tags: |

It is much easier to burn men than to burn their opinions.

Background. "It is much easier to burn men than to burn their opinions" is a quotation from the Charles Dickens book A Child's History of England, Chapter 21 (England under Henry the Fifth: First Part). A Child's History of England is a historical work by Charles Dickens. It first appeared in serial form in the periodical Household Words, running from January 25, 1851 to December 10, 1853.   Context. Taken from the passage in Chapter 21 (England under Henry the Fifth: [...]

2018-04-24T21:07:31+00:00 Categories: A Child's History of England|Tags: |

It is dreadful to observe how long a bad example will be followed; but, it is encouraging to know that a good example is never thrown away.

Background. "It is dreadful to observe how long a bad example will be followed; but, it is encouraging to know that a good example is never thrown away" is a quotation from the Charles Dickens book A Child's History of England. Chapter 21. England under Henry the Fifth: First Part. A Child's History of England is a historical work by Charles Dickens. It first appeared in serial form in the periodical Household Words, running from January 25, 1851 to December [...]

I admire machinery … but it will never be a substitute for the face of a man, with his soul in it, encouraging another man to be brave and true.

Background. " I admire machinery ... but it will never be a substitute for the face of a man, with his soul in it, encouraging another man to be brave and true" is a quotation from the Charles Dickens short story The Wreck of the Golden Mary. The Wreck of the Golden Mary was a short story about a terrifying ordeal of the passengers when the ship Golden Mary collides with an iceberg.   Context. Taken from the following passage [...]