Alcohol

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Alcohol.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 450 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Alcohol.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


When he were overtook with drink, he hammered away at my mother, most onmerciful.

Background. "When he were overtook with drink, he hammered away at my mother, most onmerciful." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 7). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quote is said by Joe Gargery to Pip. describing his cruel and abusive father, who used to hit Joe and his mother with a hammer when drunk. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 7 of Great Expectations: I derived from [...]

2018-10-31T14:37:24+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

Carried to their respective abodes in a hackney-coach, and a state of insensibility, compounded of shrub, sherry, and excitement.

Background. "Carried to their respective abodes in a hackney-coach, and a state of insensibility, compounded of shrub, sherry, and excitement." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Characters. Chapter 4 (Miss Evans and the Eagle). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Description of getting home after a good night out. The quote is taken from the following final passage in the sketch Miss Evans and [...]

He had to pass the public-house. He lingered for an instant, walked past it, turned back again, lingered once more, and finally slunk in.

Background.  “He had to pass the public-house. He lingered for an instant, walked past it, turned back again, lingered once more, and finally slunk in.” is a quotation taken Sketches by Boz, Tales, Chapter 12 (The Drunkard’s Death). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Taken from the following passage in The Drunkard’s Death (Sketches by Boz, Tales, Chapter 12): For two whole days, all three remained [...]

The beer has reminded me that I forgot.

Background. "The beer has reminded me that I forgot." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 48). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Quotation by Ben Allen who is talking to Bob Sawyer. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 48 of The Pickwick Papers: Mr. Ben Allen and Mr. Bob Sawyer sat together in the little surgery [...]

2018-08-10T06:40:48+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

It wasn’t the wine, it was the salmon.

Background. "It wasn't the wine, it was the salmon." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 8). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Quotation said by the character Augustus Snodgrass. Taken from the following passage of Chapter 8 of The Pickwick Papers: Eleven—twelve—one o'clock had struck, and the gentlemen had not arrived. Consternation sat on every face. Could they [...]

2018-08-10T07:17:44+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , |

Fan the sinking flame of hilarity with the wing of friendship; and pass the rosy wine.

Background. "Fan the sinking flame of hilarity with the wing of friendship; and pass the rosy wine." is a quotation from The Old Curiosity Shop (Chapter 7). The Old Curiosity Shop was the fourth novel by Charles Dickens and follows the life of Nell Trent and her grandfather, both residents of The Old Curiosity Shop in London.   Context. Quotation said by the character Richard Swiveller. Richard 'Dick' Swiveller is Sampson Brass's clerk and a scheming lawyer. Laid-back and carefree, despite [...]

2018-10-12T14:11:23+00:00Categories: The Old Curiosity Shop|Tags: , |

Bring in the bottled lightning, a clean tumbler, and a corkscrew.

Background. "Bring in the bottled lightning, a clean tumbler, and a corkscrew." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 49). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Quotation said by the old 'gentleman in small-clothes', an eccentric neighbour of Mrs. Nickleby who is attempting to climb down the chimney. Having been stopped, he demands some very strong alcohol, [...]

2018-09-04T16:55:57+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: |

It was difficult to enjoy her society without becoming conscious of a smell of spirits.

Background. "It was difficult to enjoy her society without becoming conscious of a smell of spirits." is a quotation from Martin Chuzzlewit (Chapter 19). Martin Chuzzlewit is the sixth novel by Charles Dickens originally published between 1843 and 1844.   Context. Description of Sarah (Sairey) Gamp. Mrs Gamp is a nurse and midwife, happy to offer her services in return for a drink. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 19 of the novel Martin Chuzzlewit: She was a fat old woman, this [...]

2018-10-22T08:30:48+00:00Categories: Martin Chuzzlewit|Tags: |

After making a futile attempt to pull off his shoes, he fell into the fireplace.

Background. "After making a futile attempt to pull off his shoes, he fell into the fireplace." is a quotation from Martin Chuzzlewit (Chapter 9). Martin Chuzzlewit is the sixth novel by Charles Dickens originally published between 1843 and 1844.     Context. Seth Pecksniff recalls his dead wife in front of the fire before stumbling in it. Illustration by Fred Barnard from a later edition of Martin Chuzzlewit. Seth Pecksniff has a lucky escape after a little too [...]

2017-12-08T13:05:43+00:00Categories: Martin Chuzzlewit|Tags: |

They are invariably numerous and splendid in precise proportion to the dirt and poverty of the surrounding neighbourhood.

Background. "They are invariably numerous and splendid in precise proportion to the dirt and poverty of the surrounding neighbourhood." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Scenes, Chapter 22 (Gin Shops). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Description of the gin-shops around St. Giles, one of the then poorest slums of London. Taken from the following passage in Gin Shops: The extensive scale on [...]

2018-08-17T06:59:29+00:00Categories: Gin Shops, Sketches by Boz|Tags: , |
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