Appearance (Places)

The clash and glare of sundry fiery Works upon the river-side, arose by night to disturb everything except the heavy and unbroken smoke that poured out of their chimneys.

Charles Dickens David Copperfield Quotations (Chapter 47). The clash and glare of sundry fiery Works upon the river-side, arose by night to disturb everything except the heavy and unbroken smoke that poured out of their chimneys.

The neighbourhood was a dreary one at that time; as oppressive, sad, and solitary by night, as any about London.

Charles Dickens David Copperfield Quotations (Chapter 47). The neighbourhood was a dreary one at that time; as oppressive, sad, and solitary by night, as any about London.

A town of machinery and tall chimneys, out of which interminable serpents of smoke trailed themselves for ever and ever, and never got uncoiled.

Charles Dickens Hard Times Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 5). A town of machinery and tall chimneys, out of which interminable serpents of smoke trailed themselves for ever and ever, and never got uncoiled.

If any one were to ask me what in my opinion was the dullest and most stupid spot on the face of the Earth, I should decidedly say Chelmsford.

If any one were to ask me what in my opinion was the dullest and most stupid spot on the face of the Earth, I should decidedly say Chelmsford.

The sun that rises over the quiet streets of London on a bright Sunday morning, shines till his setting, on gay and happy faces.

The sun that rises over the quiet streets of London on a bright Sunday morning, shines till his setting, on gay and happy faces.

Here were poor streets where faded gentility essayed with scanty space and shipwrecked means to make its last feeble stand, but tax-gatherer and creditor came there as elsewhere, and the poverty that yet faintly struggled was hardly less squalid and manifest than that which had long ago submitted and given up the game.

Here were poor streets where faded gentility essayed with scanty space and shipwrecked means to make its last feeble stand, but tax-gatherer and creditor came there as elsewhere, and the poverty that yet faintly struggled was hardly less squalid and manifest than that which had long ago submitted and given up the game.

It was a town of red brick, or of brick that would have been red if the smoke and ashes had allowed it.

Charles Dickens Hard Times Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 5). It was a town of red brick, or of brick that would have been red if the smoke and ashes had allowed it.

Coketown lay shrouded in a haze of its own, which appeared impervious to the sun’s rays.

Charles Dickens Hard Times Quotations (Book 2, Chapter 1). Coketown lay shrouded in a haze of its own, which appeared impervious to the sun’s rays.

Several large streets all very like one another, and many small streets still more like one another, inhabited by people equally like one another.

Charles Dickens Hard Times Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 5). Several large streets all very like one another, and many small streets still more like one another, inhabited by people equally like one another.

The innermost fortifications of that ugly citadel, where Nature was as strongly bricked out as killing airs and gases were bricked in.

Charles Dickens Hard Times Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 10). The innermost fortifications of that ugly citadel, where Nature was as strongly bricked out as killing airs and gases were bricked in.

While I was scared by the immensity of London, I think I might have had some faint doubts whether it was not rather ugly, crooked, narrow, and dirty.

While I was scared by the immensity of London, I think I might have had some faint doubts whether it was not rather ugly, crooked, narrow, and dirty.