Appearance (Places)

A sobbing gaslight in the counting-house window, and a burglarious stream of fog creeping in to strangle it through the keyhole of the main door.

Background. "A sobbing gaslight in the counting-house window, and a burglarious stream of fog creeping in to strangle it through the keyhole of the main door." is a quotation from Our Mutual Friend (Book 3, Chapter 1). Our Mutual Friend was Charles Dickens's fourteenth and last completed novel, published between 1865.   Context. Quotation describing the dirty polluted foggy atmosphere of industrial London. Taken from the following passage in Book 3, Chapter 1 of Our Mutual Friend: It was a [...]

2018-09-14T16:04:03+00:00Categories: Our Mutual Friend|Tags: , , |

Alleys and archways, like so many cesspools, disgorged their offences of smell, and dirt, and life, upon the straggling streets; and the whole quarter reeked with crime, with filth, and misery.

Background. "Alleys and archways, like so many cesspools, disgorged their offences of smell, and dirt, and life, upon the straggling streets; and the whole quarter reeked with crime, with filth, and misery." is a quotation from A Christmas Carol (Stave 4). A Christmas Carol is a novella, or short story, written by Charles Dickens and first published in the Christmas of 1843.   Context. This quote is a description of the alleyways where the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come [...]

Several large streets all very like one another, and many small streets still more like one another, inhabited by people equally like one another.

Background. "Several large streets all very like one another, and many small streets still more like one another, inhabited by people equally like one another." is a quotation from Hard Times (Book 1, Chapter 5). Hard Times - For These Times (more commonly now known as Hard Times) is the tenth novel by Charles Dickens, first published in 1854.   Context. This quotation is a description of Coketown in Hard Times. Coketown was a fictional place, based on the industrial [...]

2018-08-03T19:00:45+00:00Categories: Hard Times|Tags: , |

This is a pretty pleasure-ground.

Background. "This is a pretty pleasure-ground." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 25). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quote is said by Wemmick's elderly father to Pip, who has arrived at Wemmick's strange hand-built house that resembles a small castle, complete with a drawbridge, canon and flagpole. Quotation taken from the following passage in Chapter 25 of Great Expectations: in which Pip arrives at Wemmick's house at Walworth [...]

2018-05-15T11:14:46+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

The sun that rises over the quiet streets of London on a bright Sunday morning, shines till his setting, on gay and happy faces.

Background. "The sun that rises over the quiet streets of London on a bright Sunday morning, shines till his setting, on gay and happy faces." is a quote taken from Sunday Under Three Heads, Chapter 1. Under the pseudonym Timothy Sparks, Dickens wrote the pamphlet Sunday Under Three Heads to defend the people’s right to pleasure on their only day of rest, Sunday, in face of plans from religious bodies to prohibit games on Sundays. It was published in July, [...]

It was a town of red brick, or of brick that would have been red if the smoke and ashes had allowed it.

Background. "It was a town of red brick, or of brick that would have been red if the smoke and ashes had allowed it." is a quotation from Hard Times (Book 1, Chapter 5). Hard Times - For These Times (more commonly now known as Hard Times) is the tenth novel by Charles Dickens, first published in 1854.   Context. This quotation is a description of Coketown in Hard Times. Coketown was a fictional place, based on the industrial mill [...]

2018-07-30T21:00:50+00:00Categories: Hard Times|Tags: , , , |

Coketown lay shrouded in a haze of its own, which appeared impervious to the sun’s rays.

Background. "Coketown lay shrouded in a haze of its own, which appeared impervious to the sun’s rays." is a quotation from Hard Times (Book 2, Chapter 1). Hard Times - For These Times (more commonly now known as Hard Times) is the tenth novel by Charles Dickens, first published in 1854.   Context. Taken from the following introductory passage in Chapter 1 of Book 2 of Hard Times, a smoggy filthy industrial town. A sunny midsummer day. There was such a [...]

2018-07-30T20:56:13+00:00Categories: Hard Times|Tags: , , , |

A place much changed in feature and in fortune, yet with some relish of ancient greatness about it.

Background. "A place much changed in feature and in fortune, yet with some relish of ancient greatness about it." is a quotation from Little Dorrit (Book 1, Chapter 12). Little Dorrit was the eleventh novel from Charles Dickens, serialised between 1855 and 1857. A rags to riches story set in the 1820’s, Little Dorrit centres around the changing fortunes of the Dorrit family.   Context. This quotation is a description of Bleeding Heart Yard near the Saffron Hill slum in [...]

2018-05-15T11:43:27+00:00Categories: Little Dorrit|Tags: |

While I was scared by the immensity of London, I think I might have had some faint doubts whether it was not rather ugly, crooked, narrow, and dirty.

Background. "While I was scared by the immensity of London, I think I might have had some faint doubts whether it was not rather ugly, crooked, narrow, and dirty." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 20). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Pip reflects on newly arriving in London. Taken from the following passage at the beginning of Chapter 20 of Great Expectations: The journey from our town to the [...]

2018-05-30T09:04:27+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

Here were poor streets where faded gentility essayed with scanty space and shipwrecked means to make its last feeble stand, but tax-gatherer and creditor came there as elsewhere, and the poverty that yet faintly struggled was hardly less squalid and manifest than that which had long ago submitted and given up the game.

Background. "Here were poor streets where faded gentility essayed with scanty space and shipwrecked means to make its last feeble stand, but tax-gatherer and creditor came there as elsewhere, and the poverty that yet faintly struggled was hardly less squalid and manifest than that which had long ago submitted and given up the game." is a quotation from The Old Curiosity Shop (Chapter 15). The Old Curiosity Shop was the fourth novel by Charles Dickens and follows the life of Nell [...]

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