Children

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Children.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 500 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Children.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


Three meals of thin gruel a day, with an onion twice a week, and half a roll of Sundays.

Charles Dickens Oliver Twist Quotations (Chapter 2). Three meals of thin gruel a day, with an onion twice a week, and half a roll of Sundays.

2019-05-07T19:20:04+01:00Categories: Oliver Twist|Tags: , |

Not an orphan in the wide world can be so deserted as the child who is an outcast from a living parent’s love.

Not an orphan in the wide world can be so deserted as the child who is an outcast from a living parent’s love.

2019-05-04T06:06:17+01:00Categories: Dombey and Son|Tags: , |

The children are tired, and amuse themselves and the company generally by crying, or resort to the much more pleasant expedient of going to sleep.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations. The children are tired, and amuse themselves and the company generally by crying, or resort to the much more pleasant expedient of going to sleep.

2019-04-16T22:07:44+01:00Categories: Sketches by Boz|Tags: |

An orphan boy with burning cheeks and great gaunt eager eyes, who was in pressing peril of death, too, and who had no possession under the broad sky but a bottle of physic and a scrap of writing.

An orphan boy with burning cheeks and great gaunt eager eyes, who was in pressing peril of death, too, and who had no possession under the broad sky but a bottle of physic and a scrap of writing.

2019-01-27T13:30:34+00:00Categories: A Sleep To Startle Us|Tags: , |

The miserable little being was usually summoned into another world, and there gathered to the fathers it had never known in this.

Charles Dickens Oliver Twist Quotations (Chapter 2). The miserable little being was usually summoned into another world, and there gathered to the fathers it had never known in this.

2019-04-08T21:34:16+01:00Categories: Oliver Twist|Tags: , , |

It cannot be expected that this system of farming would produce any very extraordinary or luxuriant crop.

Charles Dickens Oliver Twist Quotations (Chapter 2). It cannot be expected that this system of farming would produce any very extraordinary or luxuriant crop.

I have a pretty large experience of boys, and you’re a bad set of fellows.

Charles Dickens Great Expectations Quotations (Chapter 11). I have a pretty large experience of boys, and you’re a bad set of fellows.

2019-04-25T07:33:28+01:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

Little vessels … ready to have imperial gallons of facts poured into them until they were full to the brim.

Charles Dickens Hard Times Quotations (Book 1, Chapter 1). Little vessels ... ready to have imperial gallons of facts poured into them until they were full to the brim.

2019-04-09T19:51:20+01:00Categories: Hard Times|Tags: , , , |

For it is good to be children sometimes, and never better than at Christmas, when its mighty Founder was a child himself.

Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol Quotations (Stave 3).

2019-05-29T22:21:09+01:00Categories: A Christmas Carol|Tags: , |

In the little world in which children have their existence whosoever brings them up, there is nothing so finely perceived and so finely felt as injustice.

In the little world in which children have their existence whosoever brings them up, there is nothing so finely perceived and so finely felt as injustice.

I took a good deal o’ pains with his eddication, sir; let him run in the streets when he was wery young, and shift for hisself. It’s the only way to make a boy sharp, sir.

I took a good deal o’ pains with his eddication, sir; let him run in the streets when he was wery young, and shift for hisself. It’s the only way to make a boy sharp, sir.

2019-04-27T17:23:08+01:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , |