Tag Archives | Class

Quotations about Class by Charles Dickens

oliver_twist

He was badged and ticketed, and fell into his place at once – a parish child – the orphan of a workhouse – the humble, half-starved drudge – to be cuffed and buffeted through the world – despised by all, and pitied by none.

Background. “He was badged and ticketed, and fell into his place at once – a parish child – the orphan of a workhouse – the humble, half-starved drudge – to be cuffed and buffeted through the world – despised by all, and pitied by none” is a quotation from Oliver Twist (Chapter 1). Oliver Twist, […]

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little_dorrit

Mr Merdle was immensely rich; a man of prodigious enterprise; a Midas without the ears, who turned all he touched to gold. He was in everything good, from banking to building. He was in Parliament, of course. He was in the City, necessarily. He was Chairman of this, Trustee of that, President of the other.

Background. “Mr Merdle was immensely rich; a man of prodigious enterprise; a Midas without the ears, who turned all he touched to gold. He was in everything good, from banking to building. He was in Parliament, of course. He was in the City, necessarily. He was Chairman of this, Trustee of that, President of the […]

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little_dorrit

The mansions and their inhabitants were so much alike … that the people were often to be found drawn up on opposite sides of dinner-tables, in the shade of their own loftiness, staring at the other side of the way with the dullness of the houses.

Background. “The mansions and their inhabitants were so much alike … that the people were often to be found drawn up on opposite sides of dinner-tables, in the shade of their own loftiness, staring at the other side of the way with the dullness of the houses” is a quotation from Little Dorrit (Book 1, […]

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great_expectations

We spent as much money as we could, and got as little for it as people made up their minds to give us. We were always more or less miserable, and most of our acquaintance were in the same condition. There was a gay fiction among us that we were constantly enjoying ourselves, and a skeleton truth that we never did.

Background. “We spent as much money as we could, and got as little for it as people made up their minds to give us. We were always more or less miserable, and most of our acquaintance were in the same condition. There was a gay fiction among us that we were constantly enjoying ourselves, and […]

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great_expectations

It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home.

Background. “It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home” is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 14). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens‘s thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Taken from the following opening passages of Chapter 14 of Great Expectations: It is a most miserable thing to feel […]

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Detestation of the high is the involuntary homage of the low.

Background. “Detestation of the high is the involuntary homage of the low.“ is a quotation from A Tale of Two Cities (Book. 2, Chapter 9). A Tale of Two Cities is the twelfth novel by Charles Dickens, originally published in weekly installments between April 1859 and November 1859. It is one of two historical novels […]

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