Death

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Death.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 450 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Death.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


In the mass of white and upturned faces, the dying wretch, in his all-comprehensive look of agony, has met not one—not one—that bore the impress of pity or compassion.

Background. "In the mass of white and upturned faces, the dying wretch, in his all-comprehensive look of agony, has met not one—not one—that bore the impress of pity or compassion." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 4). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Description of an executed person at Newgate. Taken from the following passage in Chapter [...]

2018-08-16T13:04:53+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: , , |

It is strange with how little notice, good, bad, or indifferent, a man may live and die in London.

Background. "It is strange with how little notice, good, bad, or indifferent, a man may live and die in London." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Characters. Chapter 1 (Thoughts about People). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Quote taken from the opening passage of Thoughts about People: It is strange with how little notice, good, bad, or indifferent, a man may live [...]

Dead as mutton, and can’t be too dead.

Background. "Dead as mutton, and can’t be too dead." is a quotation from A Tale of Two Cities (Book 2, Chapter 14 (The Honest Tradesman). A Tale of Two Cities is the twelfth novel by Charles Dickens, originally published in weekly installments between April 1859 and November 1859. It is one of two historical novels by Dickens (the other being Barnaby Rudge). The plot centres on the years leading up to the French Revolution and culminates in the Jacobean Reign [...]

2018-11-06T19:48:31+00:00Categories: A Tale of Two Cities|Tags: |

Avay vith melincholly, as the little boy said ven his schoolmissus died.

Background. "Avay vith melincholly, as the little boy said ven his schoolmissus died." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 44). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Taken from the following passage of Chapter 44 of The Pickwick Papers: Mr. Pickwick could scarcely forbear smiling, but managing to preserve his gravity, he drew forth the coin, and placed [...]

2018-02-24T19:49:05+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

Dead, your Majesty. Dead, my lords and gentlemen. Dead, right reverends and wrong reverends of every order. Dead, men and women, born with heavenly compassion in your hearts. And dying thus around us every day.

Background. "Dead, your Majesty. Dead, my lords and gentlemen. Dead, right reverends and wrong reverends of every order. Dead, men and women, born with heavenly compassion in your hearts. And dying thus around us every day." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 47). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. This quotation is a harsh criticism on society by [...]

2018-09-26T09:37:51+00:00Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , , |

I was sent for life. It’s death to come back.

Background. "I was sent for life. It's death to come back." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 39). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation said by the character Abel Magwitch. The convict Abel Magwitch returns to England after being transported to Australia for his crimes. Magwitch is not supposed to return to the country and in this quote explains to Pip that he was sent there for life, and [...]

2018-07-30T08:56:45+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

It’s likely to be a very cheap funeral, for upon my life I don’t know of anybody to go to it.

Background. "It’s likely to be a very cheap funeral for upon my life I don’t know of anybody to go to it." is a quotation from A Christmas Carol (Stave 4). A Christmas Carol is a novella, or short story, written by Charles Dickens and first published in the Christmas of 1843.   Context. The quote is said by some businessmen taking about the death of Ebenezer Scrooge who are joking about the lack of people likely to be at his [...]

2018-08-19T07:34:38+00:00Categories: A Christmas Carol|Tags: |

It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide; and, if that spirit goes not forth in life, it is condemned to do so after death.

Charles Dickens A Christmas Carol Quotations. It is required of every man that the spirit within him should walk abroad among his fellow-men, and travel far and wide; and, if that spirit goes not forth in life, it is condemned to do so after death.

2018-12-04T18:17:12+00:00Categories: A Christmas Carol|Tags: , |

Death, fires, and burglary, make all men equals.

Background. "Death, fires, and burglary, make all men equals." is a quotation from Oliver Twist (Chapter 28). Oliver Twist, subtitled The Parish Boy’s Progress, is the second novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1837.   Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 28 of Oliver Twist: Oliver felt such fear come over him when he recognised the place, that, for the instant, he forgot the agony of his wound, and thought only of flight. Flight! He could scarcely stand: and [...]

2018-09-30T14:26:41+00:00Categories: Oliver Twist|Tags: , |
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