Emotions

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Emotions.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 450 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Emotions.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


From that hour I felt quite easy with him, quite unreserved, quite content to know no more, quite happy.

Background. "From that hour I felt quite easy with him, quite unreserved, quite content to know no more, quite happy." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 8). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. Quote by the character Esther Summerson during her narrative in Bleak House. Esther is speaking about John Jarndyce,. Mr. Jarndyce is guardian to Richard, Ada, [...]

2018-10-30T07:16:47+00:00Categories: Bleak House|Tags: |

I sometimes have sick fancies.

Background. "I sometimes have sick fancies." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 8). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation said by the character Miss Havisham talking to Pip. Miss Havisham asks Pip to play with Estella to amuse her. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 8 of Great Expectations: “Who is it?” said the lady at the table. “Pip, ma’am.” “Pip?” “Mr. Pumblechook’s boy, ma’am. Come—to play.” “Come nearer; [...]

2018-10-29T09:48:40+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

Suffering has been stronger than all other teaching, and has taught me to understand what your heart used to be.

Background. "Suffering has been stronger than all other teaching, and has taught me to understand what your heart used to be." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 59). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 59 of Great Expectations, in which Estella is talking to Pip about their friendship: "But you said to me, returned Estella, very earnestly, “God bless you, God forgive you!’ [...]

2018-10-12T08:21:02+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

In a word, it was impossible for me to separate her, in the past or in the present, from the innermost life of my life.

Background. "In a word, it was impossible for me to separate her, in the past or in the present, from the innermost life of my life." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 29). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Pip sums up his feelings for Estella. Taken from the opening passage in Chapter 29 of Great Expectations: Estella laughed, and looked at the shoe in her hand, and laughed again, and [...]

2018-09-27T23:33:41+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

Break their hearts my pride and hope, break their hearts and have no mercy!

Background. "Break their hearts my pride and hope, break their hearts and have no mercy!" is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 12). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation said by Miss Havisham to Estella, as recalled by Pip (the narrator of the novel). Miss Havisham is a wealthy spinster who was jilted at the altar, an act which has driven her to live a reclusive life. She lives in [...]

2018-09-11T12:18:20+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts.

Background. "Have a heart that never hardens, and a temper that never tires, and a touch that never hurts." is a quotation from Our Mutual Friend (Book 3, Chapter 2). Our Mutual Friend was Charles Dickens's fourteenth and last completed novel, published between 1865.   Context. Quotation said by the character Miss Abbey Potterson. Taken from the following passage in Book 3, Chapter 2 of Our Mutual Friend: Miss Potterson was stooping to loosen the bonnet-strings of the dolls' dressmaker. She [...]

2018-09-12T17:02:38+00:00Categories: Our Mutual Friend|Tags: |

There was a light with nothing to rest upon, a fire with nothing to burn, a starved imagination keeping life in itself somehow.

Background. "There was a light with nothing to rest upon, a fire with nothing to burn, a starved imagination keeping life in itself somehow." is a quotation from Hard Times (Book 1, Chapter 3). Hard Times - For These Times (more commonly now known as Hard Times) is the tenth novel by Charles Dickens, first published in 1854.   Context.  This quote is a description of Louisa Gradgrind. Louisa and her brother Tom, the two eldest of Thomas Gradgrind's children, [...]

2018-08-01T23:07:52+00:00Categories: Hard Times|Tags: , , |

I stole her heart away, and put ice in its place.

Background. "I stole her heart away, and put ice in its place." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 49). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation said by the character Miss Havisham talking to Pip. In the story of Great Expectations, Havisham instills a bitterness into her young ward Estella to hate men and break their hearts, in revenge for being jilted herself. Later on, Miss Havisham repents when Estella [...]

2018-09-18T07:07:39+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

I never had one hour’s happiness in her society, and yet my mind all round the four-and-twenty hours was harping on the happiness of having her with me unto death.

Background. "I never had one hour's happiness in her society, and yet my mind all round the four-and-twenty hours was harping on the happiness of having her with me unto death." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 38). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation said by the character Pip, reflecting on his desire to spend his life with Estella. Estella has been sent to live in the house of [...]

2018-09-23T10:51:57+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

I began fully to know how wrecked I was.

Background. "I began fully to know how wrecked I was." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 39). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Pip reflects on how his ambitions have changed. he now finds himself harboring a wanted man, and his dreams of marrying Estella have been shattered. The quote comes at the end of Volume 2 of Great Expectations. Volume 2 begins with Pip moving to London to start [...]

2018-08-11T17:53:55+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |
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