Execution

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Execution.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 400 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Execution.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


Everything told of life and animation, but one dark cluster of objects in the centre of all – the black stage, the cross-beam, the rope, and all the hideous apparatus of death.

Background. "Everything told of life and animation, but one dark cluster of objects in the centre of all - the black stage, the cross-beam, the rope, and all the hideous apparatus of death" is a quotation from Oliver Twist (Chapter 52). Oliver Twist, subtitled The Parish Boy’s Progress, is the second novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1837.   Context. Description of the gallows, prepared for Fagin, amongst a great crowd of people outside Newgate prison.   Have Your Say. [...]

2017-12-08T13:15:20+00:00 Categories: Oliver Twist|Tags: , , |

What a fine thing capital punishment is! Dead men never repent; dead men never bring awkward stories to light.

Background.  "What a fine thing capital punishment is! Dead men never repent; dead men never bring awkward stories to light." is a quotation from Oliver Twist (Chapter 9). Oliver Twist, subtitled The Parish Boy’s Progress, is the second novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1837.   Context. Quotation said by the character Fagin (who Dickens often referred to as 'the Jew' in the Oliver Twist). Taken from the following passage in Chapter 9 of Oliver Twist: It was late next morning [...]

2018-02-21T20:30:55+00:00 Categories: Oliver Twist|Tags: , |

It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known.

Background. "It is a far, far better thing that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better rest that I go to than I have ever known." is a quotation from A Tale of Two Cities (Book. 3, Chapter 15). A Tale of Two Cities is the twelfth novel by Charles Dickens, originally published in weekly installments between April 1859 and November 1859. It is one of two historical novels by Dickens (the other being [...]

2017-12-08T13:24:45+00:00 Categories: A Tale of Two Cities|Tags: , |

Along the Paris streets, the death-carts rumble, hollow and harsh. Six tumbrils carry the day’s wine to La Guillotine.

Background. "Along the Paris streets, the death-carts rumble, hollow and harsh. Six tumbrils carry the day's wine to La Guillotine." is a quotation from A Tale of Two Cities (Book 3, Chapter 15). A Tale of Two Cities is the twelfth novel by Charles Dickens, originally published in weekly installments between April 1859 and November 1859. It is one of two historical novels by Dickens (the other being Barnaby Rudge). The plot centres on the years leading up to the [...]

2017-12-08T13:25:01+00:00 Categories: A Tale of Two Cities|Tags: , , , |

It was the popular theme for jests; it was the best cure for headache, it infallibly prevented the hair from turning grey, it imparted a peculiar delicacy to the complexion, it was the National Razor which shaved close: who kissed La Guillotine, looked through the little window and sneezed into the sack.

Background. "It was the popular theme for jests; it was the best cure for headache, it infallibly prevented the hair from turning grey, it imparted a peculiar delicacy to the complexion, it was the National Razor which shaved close: who kissed La Guillotine, looked through the little window and sneezed into the sack." is a quotation from A Tale of Two Cities (Book. 3, Chapter 4 (Calm in Storm)). A Tale of Two Cities is the twelfth novel by Charles [...]

2018-05-29T19:30:26+00:00 Categories: A Tale of Two Cities|Tags: , |

I have seen, habitually, some of the worst sources of general contamination and corruption in this country, and I think there are not many phases of London life that could surprise me.

Background. "I have seen, habitually, some of the worst sources of general contamination and corruption in this country, and I think there are not many phases of London life that could surprise me" is a quotation from a letter to The Times written by Charles Dickens (on the Manning execution at Horsemonger Lane Gaol), November 1849.   Context. Charles Dickens attended an execution at Horsemonger Lane Gaol on the morning of Tuesday 13th November 1849, staying all night to witness [...]

I stand astounded and appalled by the wickedness it exhibits.

Background. "I stand astounded and appalled by the wickedness it exhibits." is a quotation from a letter to The Times written by Charles Dickens (on the Manning execution at Horsemonger Lane Gaol), November 1849.   Context. Charles Dickens attended an execution at Horsemonger Lane Gaol on the morning of Tuesday 13th November 1849, staying all night to witness the crowds gathering for the event. Maria and Frederick Manning were hanged on gallows erected on the flat roof of the prison’s gatehouse for [...]

2018-05-26T16:24:59+00:00 Categories: Letters to Newspapers|Tags: , |