Family

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Family.

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 450 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Family.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


The Barnacles were a very high family, and a very large family.

Background. "The Barnacles were a very high family, and a very large family." is a Quotation from Little Dorrit. Book 1, Chapter 10. Little Dorrit was the eleventh novel from Charles Dickens, serialised between 1855 and 1857. A rags to riches story set in the 1820’s, Little Dorrit centres around the changing fortunes of the Dorrit family.   Context. Until civil service reforms of the mid nineteenth century, jobs in government offices were often filled through family connections.  In Little [...]

2018-02-23T19:44:14+00:00Categories: Little Dorrit|Tags: , |

Accidents will occur in the best-regulated families.

Background. "Accidents will occur in the best-regulated families." is a quotation from David Copperfield (Chapter 28). David Copperfield is the eighth novel by Charles Dickens, first published between 1849 and 1850.   Context. Quote said by Wilkins Micawber to David Copperfield. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 28 of David Copperfield: ‘Micawber!’ exclaimed Mrs. Micawber, in tears. ‘Have I deserved this! I, who never have deserted you; who never WILL desert you, Micawber!’ ‘My love,’ said Mr. Micawber, much affected, [...]

2018-05-11T21:55:08+00:00Categories: David Copperfield|Tags: , |

My father’s family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip.

Background. "My father’s family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip. So, I called myself Pip, and came to be called Pip." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 1). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. These are the opening lines of Great Expectations, introducing the character of Pip. The most important character in the [...]

2018-10-03T01:47:58+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations.

Background. "It is a melancholy truth that even great men have their poor relations." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 28). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.     Context. Taken from the following opening passages of Chapter 28 of Bleak House: Sir Leicester Dedlock has got the better, for the time being, of the family gout and is once more, [...]

2018-05-09T16:44:31+00:00Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

Dombey sat in the corner of the darkened room in the great arm-chair by the bedside, and Son lay tucked up warm in a little basket bedstead, carefully disposed on a low settee immediately in front of the fire and close to it, as if his constitution were analogous to that of a muffin, and it was essential to toast him brown while he was very new.

Background. "Dombey sat in the corner of the darkened room in the great arm-chair by the bedside, and Son lay tucked up warm in a little basket bedstead, carefully disposed on a low settee immediately in front of the fire and close to it, as if his constitution were analogous to that of a muffin, and it was essential to toast him brown while he was very new." is a quotation from Dombey and Son (Chapter 1). Dombey and Son [...]

2018-06-01T20:59:40+00:00Categories: Dombey and Son|Tags: |
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