Food

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Food.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 450 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Food.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


A speckled cannon-ball, so hard and firm, blazing in half of half-a-quartern of ignited brandy, and bedight with Christmas holly stuck into the top.

"A speckled cannon-ball, so hard and firm, blazing in half of half-a-quartern of ignited brandy, and bedight with Christmas holly stuck into the top." is a quotation from A Christmas Carol (Stave 3). Dickens humourously describes a Christmas pudding in the popular festive short story A Christmas Carol. The pudding has been cooked in the Cratchit household. Hallo! A great deal of steam! The pudding was out of the copper. A smell like a washing-day! That was the cloth. A [...]

2018-12-06T08:45:41+00:00Categories: A Christmas Carol|Tags: , |

It wasn’t the wine, it was the salmon.

Background. "It wasn't the wine, it was the salmon." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 8). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. Quotation said by the character Augustus Snodgrass. Taken from the following passage of Chapter 8 of The Pickwick Papers: Eleven—twelve—one o'clock had struck, and the gentlemen had not arrived. Consternation sat on every face. Could they [...]

2018-08-10T07:17:44+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , |

It’s a wery remarkable circumstance, Sir, that poverty and oysters always seem to go together.

Background. "It’s a wery remarkable circumstance, Sir, that poverty and oysters always seem to go together." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 22). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. In this quotation, the character Sam Weller seems to have spotted a correlation between the number of stalls selling oysters in poorer areas. Taken from the following passages [...]

2018-08-10T06:16:58+00:00Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: , |

Drinking-tents were full, glasses began to clink in carriages, hampers to be unpacked, tempting provisions to be set forth, knives and forks to rattle, champagne corks to fly, eyes to brighten that were not dull before, and pickpockets to count their gains during the last heat

Background. "Drinking-tents were full, glasses began to clink in carriages, hampers to be unpacked, tempting provisions to be set forth, knives and forks to rattle, champagne corks to fly, eyes to brighten that were not dull before, and pickpockets to count their gains during the last heat." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 50). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between

2018-02-23T19:49:06+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: , |

A smell like a washing-day!

Background. "A smell like a washing-day!" is a quotation from A Christmas Carol (Stave 3). A Christmas Carol is a novella, or short story, written by Charles Dickens and first published in the Christmas of 1843.   Context. This is an example of the figurative language Charles Dickens uses in his works, here using a simile to compare the pleasant aroma of a freshly baked Christmas pudding as the lid is opened and the smell wafts around the room. He [...]

2018-10-02T22:31:21+00:00Categories: A Christmas Carol|Tags: , , |

Please, sir, I want some more.

Background. "Please, sir, I want some more" is a quotation from Oliver Twist (Chapter 2). Oliver Twist, subtitled The Parish Boy’s Progress, is the second novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1837.     Context. Image from the 1968 musical Oliver! in which Oliver Twist (played by Mark Lester) asks for more food. Taken from the following paragraph in Chapter 2: The evening arrived; the boys took their places. The master, in his cook’s uniform, stationed himself at the [...]

2018-02-21T20:30:57+00:00Categories: Oliver Twist|Tags: , , , |

The bowls never wanted washing.

Background. "The bowls never wanted washing." is a quotation from Oliver Twist (Chapter 2). Oliver Twist, subtitled The Parish Boy’s Progress, is the second novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1837.   Context. Taken from the following paragraph in Chapter 2 of Oliver Twist: The bowls never wanted washing. The boys polished them with their spoons till they shone again; and when they had performed this operation (which never took very long, the spoons being nearly as large as the bowls), [...]

2018-08-10T07:12:13+00:00Categories: Oliver Twist|Tags: , , |

Three meals of thin gruel a day, with an onion twice a week, and half a roll of Sundays.

Background. "Three meals of thin gruel a day, with an onion twice a week, and half a roll of Sundays." is a quotation from Oliver Twist (Chapter 2). Oliver Twist, subtitled The Parish Boy’s Progress, is the second novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1837.   Context. Taken from the following paragraph in Chapter 2: The members of this board were very sage, deep, philosophical men; and when they came to turn their attention to the workhouse, they found out at [...]

2017-12-08T13:15:11+00:00Categories: Oliver Twist|Tags: , |

I lived principally on Dora and coffee.

Background. "I lived principally on Dora and coffee" is a quotation from David Copperfield (Chapter 28). David Copperfield is the eighth novel by Charles Dickens, first published between 1849 and 1850.   Context. Taken from the following opening paragraph of Chapter 28 of David Copperfield: Until the day arrived on which I was to entertain my newly-found old friends, I lived principally on Dora and coffee. In my love-lorn condition, my appetite languished; and I was glad of it, for I [...]

2018-02-21T20:30:31+00:00Categories: David Copperfield|Tags: , |
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