Gin Palaces

Gin-drinking is a great vice in England, but wretchedness and dirt are a greater; and until you improve the homes of the poor, or persuade a half-famished wretch not to seek relief in the temporary oblivion of his own misery, with the pittance which, divided among his family, would furnish a morsel of bread for each, gin-shops will increase in number and splendour.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations (Gin Shops). Gin-drinking is a great vice in England, but wretchedness and dirt are a greater; and until you improve the homes of the poor, or persuade a half-famished wretch not to seek relief in the temporary oblivion of his own misery, with the pittance which, divided among his family, would furnish a morsel of bread for each, gin-shops will increase in number and splendour.

Onward it has rushed to every part of town, knocking down all the old public-houses, and depositing splendid mansions, stone balustrades, rosewood fittings, immense lamps, and illuminated clocks, at the corner of every street.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations (Gin Shops). Onward it has rushed to every part of town, knocking down all the old public-houses, and depositing splendid mansions, stone balustrades, rosewood fittings, immense lamps, and illuminated clocks, at the corner of every street.

They are invariably numerous and splendid in precise proportion to the dirt and poverty of the surrounding neighbourhood.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations (Gin Shops). They are invariably numerous and splendid in precise proportion to the dirt and poverty of the surrounding neighbourhood.

A confused mixture of arms, legs, staves, torn coats, shouting, and struggling.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations (Gin Shops). A confused mixture of arms, legs, staves, torn coats, shouting, and struggling.

A stout, coarse fellow in a fur cap, put on very much on one side to give him a knowing air, and to display his sandy whiskers to the best advantage.

Charles Dickens Sketches by Boz Quotations (Gin Shops). A stout, coarse fellow in a fur cap, put on very much on one side to give him a knowing air, and to display his sandy whiskers to the best advantage.