Greed

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Greed.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 450 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Greed.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


Hard and sharp as flint.

Background. "Hard and sharp as flint." is a quotation from A Christmas Carol (Stave 1). A Christmas Carol is a novella, or short story, written by Charles Dickens and first published in the Christmas of 1843.   Illustration from the original publication of A Christmas Carol showing Ebenezer Scrooge (left), here being visited by the ghost of his former business partner, Jacob Marley. Context. The quote is from a paragraph describing Ebenezer Scrooge at the beginning of A [...]

2018-10-14T22:09:06+00:00Categories: A Christmas Carol|Tags: |

Gold conjures up a mist about a man.

Background. "Gold conjures up a mist about a man." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 1). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 1 of Nicholas Nickleby : On the death of his father, Ralph Nickleby, who had been some time before placed in a mercantile house in London, applied himself [...]

2018-07-21T19:43:22+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: |

This boy is Ignorance. This girl is Want.

Background. "This boy is Ignorance. This girl is Want." is a quotation from A Christmas Carol (Stave 3). A Christmas Carol is a novella, or short story, written by Charles Dickens and first published in the Christmas of 1843.   Context. Quote said by The Ghost of Christmas Present to Ebenezer Scrooge. Taken from the following passage in Stave 3 of A Christmas Carol: “Oh, Man! look here. Look, look, down here!” exclaimed the Ghost. They were a boy and girl. [...]

2018-05-01T10:11:09+00:00Categories: A Christmas Carol|Tags: , |

The father of this pleasant grandfather, of the neighbourhood of Mount Pleasant, was a horny-skinned, two-legged, money-getting species of spider who spun webs to catch unwary flies and retired into holes until they were entrapped. The name of this old pagan’s god was Compound Interest.

Background. "The father of this pleasant grandfather, of the neighbourhood of Mount Pleasant, was a horny-skinned, two-legged, money-getting species of spider who spun webs to catch unwary flies and retired into holes until they were entrapped. The name of this old pagan's god was Compound Interest" is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 21). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   [...]

2017-12-08T13:23:16+00:00Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , , |

The one great principle of the English law is, to make business for itself. There is no other principle distinctly, certainly, and consistently maintained through all its narrow turnings.

Background. "The one great principle of the English law is, to make business for itself. There is no other principle distinctly, certainly, and consistently maintained through all its narrow turnings." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 39). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. This quotation is taken from the following passage in Chapter 39 (Attorney and Client) of [...]

2018-08-25T07:31:18+00:00Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , , |
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