Guilt

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Guilt.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 450 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Guilt.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


When I heard the Sunday bells, and looked around a little more upon the outspread beauty, I felt that I was not nearly thankful enough.

Background. "When I heard the Sunday bells, and looked around a little more upon the outspread beauty, I felt that I was not nearly thankful enough!" is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 57). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Pip reflects on his life and ungratitude. Having gained a fortune, and lost it along with a new circle of friends, he is taken back to the simplier days of his [...]

2018-09-09T17:23:11+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , , |

Tell me of my ingratitude. Don’t be so good to me!

Background. "Tell me of my ingratitude. Don’t be so good to me!" is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 57). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Pip tells Joe to tell him how ungrateful he has been towards him. Pip, having lost his fortune and friends, is alone and feeling ill at his lodgings. He wakes to find his good-natured brother-in-law Joe Gargery has come to nurse him back to health, despite Pip [...]

2018-03-21T09:37:42+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

He washed his clients off, as if he were a surgeon or a dentist.

Background. "He washed his clients off, as if he were a surgeon or a dentist." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 26). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quote describes an observation of the lawyer Jaggers by Pip about his constant need to wash his hands. The washing is symbolic of Jaggers washing off the deeds of his clients, or possibly his guilt at helping them. Dickens refers to [...]

2018-07-30T16:37:22+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , , , |

Don’t commit yourself, and don’t commit any one. You understand—any one. Don’t tell me anything: I don’t want to know anything; I am not curious.

Background. "Don't commit yourself, and don't commit any one. You understand—any one. Don't tell me anything: I don't want to know anything; I am not curious." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 40). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.     Context. Quotation said by the lawyer Mr. Jaggers to Pip, who has inferred that his benefactor is Abel Magwitch has returned to England. Jaggers, a successful and careful lawyer, doesn't want [...]

2018-07-30T16:29:21+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , , |

Clasping his wrists as if he were taking himself into custody.

Background. "Clasping his wrists as if he were taking himself into custody" is a quotation from Little Dorrit (Book 1, Chapter 33). Little Dorrit was the eleventh novel from Charles Dickens, serialised between 1855 and 1857. A rags to riches story set in the 1820’s, Little Dorrit centres around the changing fortunes of the Dorrit family.   Context. In this quotation, the wealthy but corrupt banker Mr. Merdle perhaps, subconsciously, hints at things to come. Taken from the following passage in [...]

2018-07-21T18:07:42+00:00Categories: Little Dorrit|Tags: , |
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