Law

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Law.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 450 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Law.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


A loud buzz swept into the street as if the baffled blue-flies were dispersing in search of other carrion.

Background. "A loud buzz swept into the street as if the baffled blue-flies were dispersing in search of other carrion." is a quotation from A Tale of Two Cities (Book 2, Chapter 3 (A Disappointment). A Tale of Two Cities is the twelfth novel by Charles Dickens, originally published in weekly installments between April 1859 and November 1859. It is one of two historical novels by Dickens (the other being Barnaby Rudge). The plot centres on the years leading up [...]

2018-11-07T07:39:21+00:00Categories: A Tale of Two Cities|Tags: , |

A buzz arose in the court as if a cloud of great blue-flies were swarming about the prisoner, in anticipation of what he was soon to become.

Background. "A buzz arose in the court as if a cloud of great blue-flies were swarming about the prisoner, in anticipation of what he was soon to become." is a quotation from A Tale of Two Cities (Book 2, Chapter 3 (A Disappointment). A Tale of Two Cities is the twelfth novel by Charles Dickens, originally published in weekly installments between April 1859 and November 1859. It is one of two historical novels by Dickens (the other being Barnaby Rudge). [...]

2018-11-07T07:44:29+00:00Categories: A Tale of Two Cities|Tags: , |

It’s about a will and the trusts under a will—or it was once. It’s about nothing but costs now.

Background. "It’s about a will and the trusts under a will—or it was once. It’s about nothing but costs now." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 8). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. Quotation said by the character John Jarndyce, talking to Esther. Mr. Jarndyce is guardian to Richard, Ada, and Esther, and owner of Bleak House. Jarndyce [...]

2018-11-01T11:19:48+00:00Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

The Chancellor will have something to say about it; the satellites will have something to say about it; they will all have to be handsomely feed, all round, about it; the whole thing will be vastly ceremonious, wordy, unsatisfactory, and expensive, and I call it, in general, wiglomeration.

Background. "The Chancellor will have something to say about it; the satellites will have something to say about it; they will all have to be handsomely feed, all round, about it; the whole thing will be vastly ceremonious, wordy, unsatisfactory, and expensive, and I call it, in general, wiglomeration." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 8). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court [...]

2018-10-30T11:25:30+00:00Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

The lawyers have twisted it into such a state of bedevilment that the original merits of the case have long disappeared from the face of the earth.

Background. "The lawyers have twisted it into such a state of bedevilment that the original merits of the case have long disappeared from the face of the earth." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 8). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. Quotation said by the character John Jarndyce, talking to Esther. Mr. Jarndyce is guardian to Richard, Ada, [...]

2018-11-01T11:08:50+00:00Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

Through years and years, and lives and lives, everything goes on, constantly beginning over and over again, and nothing ever ends.

Background. "Through years and years, and lives and lives, everything goes on, constantly beginning over and over again, and nothing ever ends." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 8). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. Quotation said by the character John Jarndyce, talking to Esther. Mr. Jarndyce is guardian to Richard, Ada, and Esther, and owner of Bleak [...]

2018-10-29T13:28:13+00:00Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , , |

The magistrates shivered under a single bite of his finger. Thieves and thief-takers hung in dread rapture on his words, and shrank when a hair of his eyebrows turned in their direction.

Background. "The magistrates shivered under a single bite of his finger. Thieves and thief-takers hung in dread rapture on his words, and shrank when a hair of his eyebrows turned in their direction." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 24). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quote describes the lawyer Jaggers., a man who instilled fear in both members of the judiciary and criminals alike. Quotation taken from the [...]

2018-10-11T08:31:41+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , , |

Mr. Edkins … makes a speech on every occasion on which a speech can possibly be made: the eloquence of which can only be equalled by its length. In the event of his not being previously appointed to a judgeship, it is probable that he will practise as a barrister in the New Central Criminal Court.

Background. "Mr. Edkins ... makes a speech on every occasion on which a speech can possibly be made: the eloquence of which can only be equalled by its length. In the event of his not being previously appointed to a judgeship, it is probable that he will practise as a barrister in the New Central Criminal Court." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Tales. Chapter 7 (The Steam Excursion). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by [...]

2018-08-17T07:28:30+00:00Categories: Sketches by Boz, The Steam Excursion|Tags: , |

What lawsuits grow out of the graves of rich men, every day; sowing perjury, hatred, and lies among near kindred, where there should be nothing but love!

Background. "What lawsuits grow out of the graves of rich men, every day; sowing perjury, hatred, and lies among near kindred, where there should be nothing but love!" is a quotation from Martin Chuzzlewit (Chapter 3). Martin Chuzzlewit was the sixth novel by Charles Dickens originally published between 1843 and 1844.   Context. Quotation said by the older Martin Chuzzlewit (there are two characters called Martin Chuzzlewit in the novel of the same name, an elderly Martin and his grandson). [...]

2017-12-08T13:03:10+00:00Categories: Martin Chuzzlewit|Tags: |

He washed his clients off, as if he were a surgeon or a dentist.

Background. "He washed his clients off, as if he were a surgeon or a dentist." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 26). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quote describes an observation of the lawyer Jaggers by Pip about his constant need to wash his hands. The washing is symbolic of Jaggers washing off the deeds of his clients, or possibly his guilt at helping them. Dickens refers to [...]

2018-07-30T16:37:22+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , , , |
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