Law

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Law.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 400 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Law.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


Mr. Edkins … makes a speech on every occasion on which a speech can possibly be made: the eloquence of which can only be equalled by its length. In the event of his not being previously appointed to a judgeship, it is probable that he will practise as a barrister in the New Central Criminal Court.

Background. "Mr. Edkins ... makes a speech on every occasion on which a speech can possibly be made: the eloquence of which can only be equalled by its length. In the event of his not being previously appointed to a judgeship, it is probable that he will practise as a barrister in the New Central Criminal Court." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Tales. Chapter 7 (The Steam Excursion). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by [...]

2018-04-28T10:19:58+00:00 Categories: Sketches by Boz, The Steam Excursion|Tags: , |

What lawsuits grow out of the graves of rich men, every day; sowing perjury, hatred, and lies among near kindred, where there should be nothing but love!

Background. "What lawsuits grow out of the graves of rich men, every day; sowing perjury, hatred, and lies among near kindred, where there should be nothing but love!" is a quotation from Martin Chuzzlewit (Chapter 3). Martin Chuzzlewit was the sixth novel by Charles Dickens originally published between 1843 and 1844.   Context. Quotation said by the older Martin Chuzzlewit (there are two characters called Martin Chuzzlewit in the novel of the same name, an elderly Martin and his grandson). [...]

2017-12-08T13:03:10+00:00 Categories: Martin Chuzzlewit|Tags: |

He washed his clients off, as if he were a surgeon or a dentist.

Background. "He washed his clients off, as if he were a surgeon or a dentist." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 26). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quote describes an observation of the lawyer Jaggers by Pip about his constant need to wash his hands. The washing is symbolic of Jaggers washing off the deeds of his clients, or possibly his guilt at helping them. Dickens refers to [...]

2018-04-24T21:50:06+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , , , |

Don’t commit yourself, and don’t commit any one. You understand—any one. Don’t tell me anything: I don’t want to know anything; I am not curious.

Background. "Don't commit yourself, and don't commit any one. You understand—any one. Don't tell me anything: I don't want to know anything; I am not curious." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 40). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.     Context. Quotation said by the lawyer Mr. Jaggers to Pip, who has inferred that his benefactor is Abel Magwitch has returned to England. Jaggers, a successful and careful lawyer, doesn't want [...]

2018-02-23T19:43:54+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , , |

There is a box of barristers on their right hand; there is an enclosure of insolvent debtors on their left; and there is an inclined plane of most especially dirty faces in their front.

Background. "There is a box of barristers on their right hand; there is an enclosure of insolvent debtors on their left; and there is an inclined plane of most especially dirty faces in their front." is a quotation from The Pickwick Papers (Chapter 43). The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, more commonly now known as simply The Pickwick Papers was Charles Dickens's first novel, published between 1836 and 1837.   Context. In this quotation, Dickens describes the Insolvent Court at [...]

2018-04-28T07:06:44+00:00 Categories: The Pickwick Papers|Tags: |

I expect a judgment. Shortly.

Background. "I expect a judgment. Shortly." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 3). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.     Context. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 3 of Bleak House: When we got under the colonnade, Mr. Kenge remembered that he must go back for a moment to ask a question and left us in the fog, with [...]

2017-12-08T13:09:13+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

If the law supposes that … the law is a ass – a idiot.

Background. "If the law supposes that the law is a ass a idiot." is a quotation from Oliver Twist (Chapter 51). Oliver Twist, subtitled The Parish Boy’s Progress, is the second novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1837.   Context. Observation by Mr. Bumble having just been informed (by Mr. Brownlow) that "the law supposes that your wife acts under your direction." Taken from the following passage in Chapter 51 of Oliver Twist: Again Mr. Brownlow nodded to Mr. Grimwig; and [...]

2018-05-15T19:32:18+00:00 Categories: Oliver Twist|Tags: |

Everything told of life and animation, but one dark cluster of objects in the centre of all – the black stage, the cross-beam, the rope, and all the hideous apparatus of death.

Background. "Everything told of life and animation, but one dark cluster of objects in the centre of all - the black stage, the cross-beam, the rope, and all the hideous apparatus of death" is a quotation from Oliver Twist (Chapter 52). Oliver Twist, subtitled The Parish Boy’s Progress, is the second novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1837.   Context. Description of the gallows, prepared for Fagin, amongst a great crowd of people outside Newgate prison.   Have Your Say. [...]

2017-12-08T13:15:20+00:00 Categories: Oliver Twist|Tags: , , |

The clerk had the same air of knowing something to everybody else’s disadvantage.

Background. "The clerk had the same air of knowing something to everybody else's disadvantage." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 20). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quote is a description of Mr. John Wemmick. Wemmick is the clerk to lawyer Mr. Jaggers. He becomes a friend to Pip after he moves to London. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 20 of Great Expectations. Pip has newly arrived in [...]

2018-05-30T08:43:34+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

Injustice breeds injustice.

Background. "Injustice breeds injustice." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 39). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Have Your Say. Give your view on "Injustice breeds injustice." with a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.   Related. If you like this, we think you might also be interested in these related quotations: [...]

2018-04-13T11:17:48+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

Keep out of Chancery…. It’s being ground to bits in a slow mill; it’s being roasted at a slow fire; it’s being stung to death by single bees; it’s being drowned by drops; it’s going mad by grains.

Background. "Keep out of Chancery.... It's being ground to bits in a slow mill; it's being roasted at a slow fire; it's being stung to death by single bees; it's being drowned by drops; it's going mad by grains" is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 5). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Have Your Say. Give your view on "Keep [...]

2017-12-08T13:23:08+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

The one great principle of the English law is, to make business for itself. There is no other principle distinctly, certainly, and consistently maintained through all its narrow turnings.

Background. "The one great principle of the English law is, to make business for itself. There is no other principle distinctly, certainly, and consistently maintained through all its narrow turnings" is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 39). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. This quotation is taken from the following passage in Chapter 39 (Attorney and Client) of [...]

2017-12-08T13:23:23+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |