London

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of London.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 400 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of London.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


It is strange with how little notice, good, bad, or indifferent, a man may live and die in London.

Background. "It is strange with how little notice, good, bad, or indifferent, a man may live and die in London." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Characters. Chapter 1 (Thoughts about People). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Quote taken from the opening passage of Thoughts about People: It is strange with how little notice, good, bad, or indifferent, a man may live [...]

There is a numerous class of people in this great metropolis who seem not to possess a single friend, and whom nobody appears to care for.

Background. "There is a numerous class of people in this great metropolis who seem not to possess a single friend, and whom nobody appears to care for." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Characters. Chapter 1 (Thoughts about People). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Quote taken from the opening passage of Thoughts about People: It is strange with how little notice, good, [...]

2018-03-27T10:45:37+00:00 Categories: Sketches by Boz, Thoughts about People|Tags: , |

Who enters here leaves noise behind.

Background. "Who enters here leaves noise behind." is a quotation from Barnaby Rudge (Chapter 15). Barnaby Rudge was the fifth novel from Charles Dickens, first published in 1841. It is the first of Dickens's two historical novels and is largely set around the time of the Gordon Riots of 1780.   Context. This quote is a description of entering the Temple area, which contains two of the four legal Inns of Court of London (Inner Temple and Middle Temple).   Have [...]

2018-04-30T12:01:29+00:00 Categories: Barnaby Rudge|Tags: , |

That particular part of Snow Hill where omnibus horses going eastward seriously think of falling down on purpose

Background. "That particular part of Snow Hill where omnibus horses going eastward seriously think of falling down on purpose." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 4). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between

2018-02-23T19:49:07+00:00 Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: , |

The sun that rises over the quiet streets of London on a bright Sunday morning, shines till his setting, on gay and happy faces.

Background. "The sun that rises over the quiet streets of London on a bright Sunday morning, shines till his setting, on gay and happy faces." is a quote taken from Sunday Under Three Heads, Chapter 1. Under the pseudonym Timothy Sparks, Dickens wrote the pamphlet Sunday Under Three Heads to defend the people’s right to pleasure on their only day of rest, Sunday, in face of plans from religious bodies to prohibit games on Sundays. It was published in July, [...]

2018-05-09T11:15:15+00:00 Categories: Sunday Under Three Heads|Tags: , |

The road to Greenwich during the whole of Easter Monday, is in a state of perpetual bustle and noise.

Background. "The road to Greenwich during the whole of Easter Monday, is in a state of perpetual bustle and noise." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Scenes, Chapter 12 (Greenwich Fair). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. In this quote, Charles Dickens describes the atmosphere of the biannual Greenwich Fair. Taken from the following passage in Greenwich Fair: In our earlier days, we [...]

2018-05-09T20:52:52+00:00 Categories: Greenwich Fair, Sketches by Boz|Tags: , |

The principal amusement is to drag young ladies up the steep hill … and then drag them down again, at the very top of their speed, greatly to the derangement of their curls and bonnet-caps, and much to the edification of lookers-on from below.

Background. "The principal amusement is to drag young ladies up the steep hill … and then drag them down again, at the very top of their speed, greatly to the derangement of their curls and bonnet-caps, and much to the edification of lookers-on from below." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Scenes, Chapter 12 (Greenwich Fair). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Young [...]

2018-05-09T21:06:13+00:00 Categories: Greenwich Fair, Sketches by Boz|Tags: , |

A three days’ fever, which cools the blood for six months afterwards.

Background. "A three days’ fever, which cools the blood for six months afterwards." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Scenes, Chapter 12 (Greenwich Fair). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. In this quote, Charles Dickens describes the atmosphere of the biannual Greenwich Fair. Taken from the opening paragraph of the sketch Greenwich Fair: If the Parks be ‘the lungs of London,’ we wonder what [...]

2018-05-09T20:58:37+00:00 Categories: Greenwich Fair, Sketches by Boz|Tags: , |

The ground was covered, nearly ankle-deep, with filth and mire; a thick steam, perpetually rising from the reeking bodies of the cattle, and mingling with the fog, which seemed to rest upon the chimney-tops, hung heavily above.

Background. "The ground was covered, nearly ankle-deep, with filth and mire; a thick steam, perpetually rising from the reeking bodies of the cattle, and mingling with the fog, which seemed to rest upon the chimney-tops, hung heavily above." is a quotation from Oliver Twist (Chapter 21). Oliver Twist, subtitled The Parish Boy’s Progress, is the second novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1837.   Context. The Smithfield area of Farringdon from a map of 1827.  In this quotation, [...]

2018-05-08T18:19:58+00:00 Categories: Oliver Twist|Tags: , |

Every Sunday night, from eleven until the clock strikes twelve, I will walk on London Bridge if I am alive.

Background. "Every Sunday night, from eleven until the clock strikes twelve, I will walk on London Bridge if I am alive" is a quotation from Oliver Twist (Chapter 40). Oliver Twist, subtitled The Parish Boy’s Progress, is the second novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1837.   Have Your Say. Give your view on "Every Sunday night, from eleven until the clock strikes twelve, I will walk on London Bridge if I am alive" with a rating and help us [...]

2017-12-08T13:16:23+00:00 Categories: Oliver Twist|Tags: , |

Every repulsive lineament of poverty, every loathsome indication of filth, rot, and garbage; all these ornament the banks of Folly Ditch.

Background. "Every repulsive lineament of poverty, every loathsome indication of filth, rot, and garbage; all these ornament the banks of Folly Ditch" is a quotation from Oliver Twist (Chapter 50). Oliver Twist, subtitled The Parish Boy’s Progress, is the second novel by Charles Dickens, published in 1837.   Context. This quotation is a description of Folly Ditch, part of the notorious slum area of Jacob's Island in Bermondsey, south London. The area was immortalised by Charles Dickens in Chapter 50 [...]

2018-05-18T22:21:28+00:00 Categories: Oliver Twist|Tags: , |

Through the heart of the town a deadly sewer ebbed and flowed, in the place of a fine fresh river.

Background. "Through the heart of the town a deadly sewer ebbed and flowed, in the place of a fine fresh river." is a quotation from Little Dorrit (Book 1, Chapter 3). Little Dorrit was the eleventh novel from Charles Dickens, serialised between 1855 and 1857. A rags to riches story set in the 1820’s, Little Dorrit centres around the changing fortunes of the Dorrit family.   Context. Description of the squalid pollution of the River Thames in London at the [...]