London

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of London.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 450 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of London.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


The whole metropolis was a heap of vapour charged with muffled sound of wheels, and enfolding a gigantic catarrh.

Background. "The whole metropolis was a heap of vapour charged with muffled sound of wheels, and enfolding a gigantic catarrh." is a quotation from Our Mutual Friend (Book 3, Chapter 1). Our Mutual Friend was Charles Dickens's fourteenth and last completed novel, published between 1864 and 1865.   Context. Quotation describing the dirty polluted foggy atmosphere of industrial London. Taken from the following passage in Book 3, Chapter 1 of Our Mutual Friend: It was a foggy day in London, [...]

2018-09-16T11:43:09+00:00Categories: Our Mutual Friend|Tags: , , , |

A sobbing gaslight in the counting-house window, and a burglarious stream of fog creeping in to strangle it through the keyhole of the main door.

Background. "A sobbing gaslight in the counting-house window, and a burglarious stream of fog creeping in to strangle it through the keyhole of the main door." is a quotation from Our Mutual Friend (Book 3, Chapter 1). Our Mutual Friend was Charles Dickens's fourteenth and last completed novel, published between 1865.   Context. Quotation describing the dirty polluted foggy atmosphere of industrial London. Taken from the following passage in Book 3, Chapter 1 of Our Mutual Friend: It was a [...]

2018-09-14T16:04:03+00:00Categories: Our Mutual Friend|Tags: , , |

Inanimate London was a sooty spectre, divided in purpose between being visible and invisible, and so being wholly neither.

Background. "Inanimate London was a sooty spectre, divided in purpose between being visible and invisible, and so being wholly neither." is a quotation from Our Mutual Friend (Book 3, Chapter 1). Our Mutual Friend was Charles Dickens's fourteenth and last completed novel, published between 1865.   Context. Quotation describing the dirty polluted foggy atmosphere of industrial London. Taken from the following passage in Book 3, Chapter 1 of Our Mutual Friend: It was a foggy day in London, and the [...]

2018-09-14T14:51:27+00:00Categories: Our Mutual Friend|Tags: , , , |

Animate London, with smarting eyes and irritated lungs, was blinking, wheezing, and choking.

Background. "Animate London, with smarting eyes and irritated lungs, was blinking, wheezing, and choking." is a quotation from Our Mutual Friend (Book 3, Chapter 1). Our Mutual Friend was Charles Dickens's fourteenth and last completed novel, published between 1865.   Context. Quotation describing the dirty polluted foggy atmosphere of industrial London. Taken from the following passage in Book 3, Chapter 1 of Our Mutual Friend: It was a foggy day in London, and the fog was heavy and dark. Animate [...]

2018-09-14T14:53:12+00:00Categories: Our Mutual Friend|Tags: , , , |

It is strange with how little notice, good, bad, or indifferent, a man may live and die in London.

Background. "It is strange with how little notice, good, bad, or indifferent, a man may live and die in London." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Characters. Chapter 1 (Thoughts about People). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Quote taken from the opening passage of Thoughts about People: It is strange with how little notice, good, bad, or indifferent, a man may live [...]

There is a numerous class of people in this great metropolis who seem not to possess a single friend, and whom nobody appears to care for.

Background. "There is a numerous class of people in this great metropolis who seem not to possess a single friend, and whom nobody appears to care for." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Characters. Chapter 1 (Thoughts about People). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Quote taken from the opening passage of Thoughts about People: It is strange with how little notice, good, [...]

Who enters here leaves noise behind.

Background. "Who enters here leaves noise behind." is a quotation from Barnaby Rudge (Chapter 15). Barnaby Rudge was the fifth novel from Charles Dickens, first published in 1841. It is the first of Dickens's two historical novels and is largely set around the time of the Gordon Riots of 1780.   Context. This quote is a description of entering the Temple area, which contains two of the four legal Inns of Court of London (Inner Temple and Middle Temple).   Have [...]

2018-04-30T12:01:29+00:00Categories: Barnaby Rudge|Tags: , |

That particular part of Snow Hill where omnibus horses going eastward seriously think of falling down on purpose

Background. "That particular part of Snow Hill where omnibus horses going eastward seriously think of falling down on purpose." is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 4). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Description of the slope up the Snow Hill area of London, where the noted coaching-inn, the Saracen’s Head Inn was situated The slope was [...]

2018-08-16T10:41:30+00:00Categories: Nicholas Nickleby|Tags: , |

The sun that rises over the quiet streets of London on a bright Sunday morning, shines till his setting, on gay and happy faces.

Background. "The sun that rises over the quiet streets of London on a bright Sunday morning, shines till his setting, on gay and happy faces." is a quote taken from Sunday Under Three Heads, Chapter 1. Under the pseudonym Timothy Sparks, Dickens wrote the pamphlet Sunday Under Three Heads to defend the people’s right to pleasure on their only day of rest, Sunday, in face of plans from religious bodies to prohibit games on Sundays. It was published in July, [...]

The road to Greenwich during the whole of Easter Monday, is in a state of perpetual bustle and noise.

Background. "The road to Greenwich during the whole of Easter Monday, is in a state of perpetual bustle and noise." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Scenes, Chapter 12 (Greenwich Fair). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. In this quote, Charles Dickens describes the atmosphere of the biannual Greenwich Fair. Taken from the following passage in Greenwich Fair: In our earlier days, we [...]

2018-05-09T20:52:52+00:00Categories: Greenwich Fair, Sketches by Boz|Tags: , |