Marriage

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Marriage.

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 400 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Marriage.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


Most of the people I know would do far better to leave marriage alone. It is at the bottom of three fourths of their troubles.

Background. "Most of the people I know would do far better to leave marriage alone. It is at the bottom of three fourths of their troubles." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 41). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Context. This quotation is said by Mr. Tulkinghorn. Tulkinghorn is Sir Leicester Deadlock’s scheming and manipulative lawyer. Taken from the following passage [...]

2017-12-08T13:09:17+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: |

There can be no disparity in marriage like unsuitability of mind and purpose.

Background. "There can be no disparity in marriage like unsuitability of mind and purpose." is a quotation from David Copperfield. The quote is featured five times in the novel, four in Chapter 45 and again in Chapter 48. David Copperfield is the eighth novel by Charles Dickens, first published between 1849 and 1850.   Context. The quotation is originally said by Annie Strong to her husband, Doctor Strong in Chapter 45 of David Copperfield: ‘It was the first unhappiness of my new [...]

2018-05-09T12:24:48+00:00 Categories: David Copperfield|Tags: |

All the housemaid hopes is, happiness for ’em – but marriage is a lottery, and the more she thinks about it, the more she feels the independence and the safety of a single life.

Background. "All the housemaid hopes is, happiness for 'em - but marriage is a lottery, and the more she thinks about it, the more she feels the independence and the safety of a single life" is a quotation from Dombey and Son (Chapter 35). Dombey and Son was Charles Dickens's seventh novel, published between 1846 and 1848.     Have Your Say. Give your view on "All the housemaid hopes is, happiness for 'em - but marriage is a lottery, [...]

2018-06-01T21:26:09+00:00 Categories: Dombey and Son|Tags: |

Matrimony is proverbially a serious undertaking.

Background. "Matrimony is proverbially a serious undertaking." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Tales. Chapter 10 (A Passage in the life of Mr. Watkins Tottle). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Taken from the following passage in A Passage in the life of Mr. Watkins Tottle (Sketches by Boz, Tales. Chapter 10): "Matrimony is proverbially a serious undertaking.  Like an over-weening predilection for brandy-and-water, it [...]

2017-12-08T13:34:34+00:00 Categories: Sketches by Boz|Tags: |