Money

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Money.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 400 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Money.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


He has frequently been exactly seven-and-sixpence short of independence.

Background.   "He has frequently been exactly seven-and-sixpence short of independence." is a quotation from The Begging-Letter Writer. The Begging-Letter Writer was an article, written by Charles Dickens, about begging letter writers. It was first published in Household Words on 18 March, 1850.   Context. Charles Dickens had been plagued with receiving begging letters after being catapulted to national fame following the success of The Pickwick Papers. The quotation is taken from the following passage of The Begging-Letter Writer: I [...]

2018-05-03T20:50:00+00:00 Categories: The Begging-Letter Writer|Tags: , |

I work pretty hard for a sufficient living.

Background. "There was a long hard time when I kept far from me the remembrance of what I had thrown away when I was quite ignorant of its worth." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 59). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quotation is said by Pip in a conversation with Estella at the end of the novel Great Expectations. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 59 of [...]

2018-05-02T10:24:03+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

A man can well afford to be as bold as brass, my good fellow, when he gets gold in exchange!’

Background. "A man can well afford to be as bold as brass, my good fellow, when he gets gold in exchange!" is a quotation from Martin Chuzzlewit (Chapter 27). Martin Chuzzlewit was the sixth novel by Charles Dickens originally published between 1843 and 1844.   Context. Quotation said by the character Montague Tigg, speaking to Jonas Chuzzlewit. Montague Tigg is a down-on-his-luck rogue at the beginning of the novel Martin Chuzzlewit, and a hanger-on to distant Chuzzlewit kin Chevy Slyme. [...]

2017-12-08T13:03:09+00:00 Categories: Martin Chuzzlewit|Tags: |

My guiding star always is, Get hold of portable property.

Background. "My guiding star always is, 'Get hold of portable property'." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 24). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quote is from Mr. John Wemmick. Wemmick is Mr Jaggers's clerk and becomes a friend to Pip after he moves to London.   Have Your Say. Give your view on "My guiding star always is, 'Get hold of portable property'." with a rating and help [...]

2018-02-23T09:00:20+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

A person who can’t pay gets another person who can’t pay to guarantee that he can pay. Like a person with two wooden legs getting another person with two wooden legs to guarantee that he has got two natural legs. It don’t make either of them able to do a walking-match.

Background. "A person who can't pay gets another person who can't pay to guarantee that he can pay. Like a person with two wooden legs getting another person with two wooden legs to guarantee that he has got two natural legs. It don't make either of them able to do a walking-match" is a quotation from Little Dorrit (Book 1, Chapter 23). Little Dorrit was the eleventh novel from Charles Dickens, serialised between 1855 and 1857. A rags to riches [...]

2018-02-23T19:44:13+00:00 Categories: Little Dorrit|Tags: , |

It was as true as taxes is. And nothing’s truer than them.

Background. "It was as true as taxes is. And nothing's truer than them." is a quotation from David Copperfield (Chapter 21). David Copperfield is the eighth novel by Charles Dickens, first published between 1849 and 1850.     Context. Quotation said by the character Mr. Barkis. Mr. Barkis is a cart driver who marries Clara Peggotty. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 21 of David Copperfield: ‘What name was it, as I wrote up in the cart, sir?’ said Mr. Barkis, with [...]

2018-02-21T20:30:36+00:00 Categories: David Copperfield|Tags: , |

Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pound ought and six, result misery.

Background. "Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery." is a quotation from David Copperfield (Chapter 12).  David Copperfield is the eighth novel by Charles Dickens, first published between 1849 and 1850.   Mr. Micawber (standing, addressing others), illustrated here by Phiz. Context. This quotation is said by the character Wilkins Micawber. Mr. Micawber was modelled on Dickens' father, John Dickens, [...]

2018-04-30T12:43:50+00:00 Categories: David Copperfield|Tags: , |

We spent as much money as we could, and got as little for it as people made up their minds to give us. We were always more or less miserable, and most of our acquaintance were in the same condition. There was a gay fiction among us that we were constantly enjoying ourselves, and a skeleton truth that we never did.

Background. "We spent as much money as we could, and got as little for it as people made up their minds to give us. We were always more or less miserable, and most of our acquaintance were in the same condition. There was a gay fiction among us that we were constantly enjoying ourselves, and a skeleton truth that we never did." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 34). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between [...]

2018-02-23T09:00:07+00:00 Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

The father of this pleasant grandfather, of the neighbourhood of Mount Pleasant, was a horny-skinned, two-legged, money-getting species of spider who spun webs to catch unwary flies and retired into holes until they were entrapped. The name of this old pagan’s god was Compound Interest.

Background. "The father of this pleasant grandfather, of the neighbourhood of Mount Pleasant, was a horny-skinned, two-legged, money-getting species of spider who spun webs to catch unwary flies and retired into holes until they were entrapped. The name of this old pagan's god was Compound Interest" is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 21). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   [...]

2017-12-08T13:23:16+00:00 Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , , |

These are mere business relations, …. there is no friendship in them, no particular interest, nothing like sentiment. I have passed from one to another, in the course of my business life, just as I pass from one of our customers to another in the course of my business day; in short, I have no feelings; I am a mere machine.

Background. "These are mere business relations, ... there is no friendship in them, no particular interest, nothing like sentiment. I have passed from one to another, in the course of my business life, just as I pass from one of our customers to another in the course of my business day; in short, I have no feelings; I am a mere machine." is a quotation from A Tale of Two Cities (Book 1, Chapter 4). A Tale of Two Cities [...]

2018-04-20T14:57:42+00:00 Categories: A Tale of Two Cities|Tags: , , |

Here’s the rule for bargains: “Do other men, for they would do you.” That’s the true business precept.

Background. "Here's the rule for bargains: "Do other men, for they would do you." That's the true business precept." is a quotation from Martin Chuzzlewit (Chapter 11). Martin Chuzzlewit was the sixth novel by Charles Dickens originally published between 1843 and 1844.   Context. Quotation said by the character Jonas Chuzzlewit. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 11 of Martin Chuzzlewit: ‘I shall drink,’ said Anthony, ‘to Pecksniff. Your father, my dears. A clever man, Pecksniff. A wary man! A hypocrite, [...]

2018-05-04T09:52:05+00:00 Categories: Martin Chuzzlewit|Tags: , |

I have made up my mind that I must have money, Pa. I feel that I can’t beg it, borrow it, or steal it; and so I have resolved that I must marry it.

Background. "I have made up my mind that I must have money, Pa. I feel that I can’t beg it, borrow it, or steal it; and so I have resolved that I must marry it." is a quotation from Our Mutual Friend (Book 2, Chapter 8). Our Mutual Friend was Charles Dickens's fourteenth and last completed novel, published between 1864 and 1865.     Have Your Say. Give your view on "I have made up my mind that I must [...]

2018-03-09T14:04:32+00:00 Categories: Our Mutual Friend|Tags: , |