Money

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Money.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 500 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Money.


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A man can well afford to be as bold as brass, my good fellow, when he gets gold in exchange!’

A man can well afford to be as bold as brass, my good fellow, when he gets gold in exchange!’

2019-04-14T21:51:34+01:00Categories: Martin Chuzzlewit|Tags: |

A person who can’t pay gets another person who can’t pay to guarantee that he can pay. Like a person with two wooden legs getting another person with two wooden legs to guarantee that he has got two natural legs. It don’t make either of them able to do a walking-match.

A person who can’t pay gets another person who can’t pay to guarantee that he can pay. Like a person with two wooden legs getting another person with two wooden legs to guarantee that he has got two natural legs. It don’t make either of them able to do a walking-match.

2019-10-19T16:42:44+01:00Categories: Little Dorrit|Tags: , |

These are mere business relations, …. there is no friendship in them, no particular interest, nothing like sentiment. I have passed from one to another, in the course of my business life, just as I pass from one of our customers to another in the course of my business day; in short, I have no feelings; I am a mere machine.

These are mere business relations, …. there is no friendship in them, no particular interest, nothing like sentiment. I have passed from one to another, in the course of my business life, just as I pass from one of our customers to another in the course of my business day; in short, I have no feelings; I am a mere machine.

Here’s the rule for bargains: “Do other men, for they would do you.” That’s the true business precept.

Here’s the rule for bargains: “Do other men, for they would do you.” That’s the true business precept.

2019-04-14T22:26:11+01:00Categories: Martin Chuzzlewit|Tags: , |