Parliament

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Parliament.

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 400 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Parliament.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


He was a tough, burly thick-headed gentleman, with a loud voice, a pompous manner, a tolerable command of sentences with no meaning in them, and, in short, every requisite for a very good member indeed.

Background. "He was a tough, burly thick-headed gentleman, with a loud voice, a pompous manner, a tolerable command of sentences with no meaning in them, and, in short, every requisite for a very good member indeed" is a quotation from Nicholas Nickleby (Chapter 16). The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, more commonly referred to as Nicholas Nickleby, is the third novel by Charles Dickens, originally serialised between 1838 and 1839.   Context. Description of Mr. Gregsbury, Member of Parliament. [...]

The arrivals increase in number, and the heat and noise increase in very unpleasant proportion.

Background. "The arrivals increase in number, and the heat and noise increase in very unpleasant proportion." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Scenes, Chapter 18 (A Parliamentary Sketch). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. In this quote, Charles Dickens describes the atmosphere inside the Houses of Parliament.   Have Your Say. Give your view on "The arrivals increase in number, and the heat [...]

Did you ever see a countenance so expressive of the most hopeless extreme of heavy dulness.

Background. "Did you ever see a countenance so expressive of the most hopeless extreme of heavy dulness." is a quotation from Sketches by Boz, Scenes, Chapter 18 (A Parliamentary Sketch). Sketches by Boz is a collection of short pieces written by Charles Dickens and published as a book in 1836.   Context. Description of "a splendid sample of a Member of the House of Commons".   Have Your Say. Give your view on "Did you ever see a countenance so [...]

2017-12-08T13:33:04+00:00Categories: Sketches by Boz|Tags: , , |

I have not the least hesitation in saying that I have the smallest amount of faith in the House of Commons.

Background. "I have not the least hesitation in saying that I have the smallest amount of faith in the House of Commons." is a quotation from a speech given by Charles Dickens at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane. The speech, promoting administrative reform, was given on 27th June 1855.   Have Your Say. Give your view on "I have not the least hesitation in saying that I have the smallest amount of faith in the House of Commons." with a [...]

2018-01-07T18:30:35+00:00Categories: Speeches|Tags: , |