Truth

Charles Dickens quotations on the theme of Truth.

 

Charles Dickens (1812 – 1870) was one of the foremost writers from the Victorian era and remains a popular widely-read author today. During his lifetime he produced 15 novels, five novellas, and a large number of shorter stories and essays. He wrote from personal experiences and concerned himself with a number of contemporary social issues whilst supporting numerous charitable causes, giving assistance in time, money or personal effort. Our archive of over 450 Charles Dickens quotations are organised by both source material, i.e. the work or speech in which it originally appeared, and also grouped thematically. In this archive, we have collected quotations from Charles Dickens works on the theme of Truth.


Click on a quotation for more information, including links to original source, the context in which it appeared, related material and the ability to give each quotation a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.


A natural incapacity to do anything secret and mean.

Background. "A natural incapacity to do anything secret and mean." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 22). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Description of Herbert Pocket. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 22 of Great Expectations: Herbert Pocket had a frank and easy way with him that was very taking. I had never seen any one then, and I have never seen any one since, who more strongly expressed [...]

2018-10-12T08:19:29+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: |

Ask no questions, and you’ll be told no lies.

Background.  "Ask no questions, and you'll be told no lies." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 2). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. This quotation is said by Pip's sister, Mrs. Joe Gargery. No first name is given in the book for his sister, who is twenty years his senior, and who mistreats the young Pip. Taken from the following passage in Chapter 2 of Great Expectations: While Mrs. Joe [...]

2018-08-11T20:06:53+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , |

Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There’s no better rule.

Background. "Take nothing on its looks; take everything on evidence. There's no better rule." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 40). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. Quotation said by the lawyer Mr. Jaggers to Pip, who is trying to confirm that his benefactor is Abel Magwitch. Although Pip has recently met Magwitch in London, Mr. Jaggers wishes to maintain that he is in New South Wales, Australia because he [...]

2018-10-30T09:40:22+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , , , |

No varnish can hide the grain of the wood; and that the more varnish you put on, the more the grain will express itself.

Background. "No varnish can hide the grain of the wood; and that the more varnish you put on, the more the grain will express itself." is a quotation from Great Expectations (Chapter 22). Great Expectations is Charles Dickens's thirteenth novel first published between 1860 and 1861.   Context. In Chapter 22 of Great Expectations, Pip and Herbert Pocket have dinner during which Herbert gives his account of the life of Miss Havisham as told to him by his father. When [...]

2018-08-29T08:41:48+00:00Categories: Great Expectations|Tags: , , , |

A word in earnest is as good as a speech.

Background. "A word in earnest is as good as a speech." is a quotation from Bleak House (Chapter 6). Bleak House was the ninth novel by Charles Dickens, intended to illustrate the evils caused by long, drawn-out legal cases in the Court of Chancery.   Have Your Say. Give your view on "A word in earnest is as good as a speech." with a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.   Related. If you [...]

2017-12-08T13:23:54+00:00Categories: Bleak House|Tags: , |

Now what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life.

Background. "Now what I want is, Facts. Teach these boys and girls nothing but Facts. Facts alone are wanted in life." is a quotation from Hard Times (Book 1, Chapter 1). Hard Times - For These Times (more commonly now known as Hard Times) is the tenth novel by Charles Dickens, first published in 1854.   Context. This quotation, said by the character Thomas Gradgrind, is taken from the opening chapter of Hard Times: ‘Now, what I want is, Facts. [...]

2018-09-10T12:55:42+00:00Categories: Hard Times|Tags: , , |

It is much easier to burn men than to burn their opinions.

Background. "It is much easier to burn men than to burn their opinions" is a quotation from the Charles Dickens book A Child's History of England, Chapter 21 (England under Henry the Fifth: First Part). A Child's History of England is a historical work by Charles Dickens. It first appeared in serial form in the periodical Household Words, running from January 25, 1851 to December 10, 1853.   Context. Taken from the passage in Chapter 21 (England under Henry the Fifth: [...]

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