The mansions and their inhabitants were so much alike … that the people were often to be found drawn up on opposite sides of dinner-tables, in the shade of their own loftiness, staring at the other side of the way with the dullness of the houses.

Background.

Little Dorrit.itemThe mansions and their inhabitants were so much alike … that the people were often to be found drawn up on opposite sides of dinner-tables, in the shade of their own loftiness, staring at the other side of the way with the dullness of the houses” is a quotation from Little Dorrit (Book 1, Chapter 21).

item Little Dorrit was the eleventh novel from Charles Dickens, serialised between 1855 and 1857. A rags to riches story set in the 1820’s, Little Dorrit centres around the changing fortunes of the Dorrit family.

 

Context.

Description of the unifromity of the residences on Harley Street, Cavendish Square and home to the Merdle household.

Taken from: “The mansions and their inhabitants were so much alike in that respect, that the people were often to be found drawn up on opposite sides of dinner-tables, in the shade of their own loftiness, staring at the other side of the way with the dullness of the houses.

 

 

Have Your Say.

Give your view on “The mansions and their inhabitants were so much alike … that the people were often to be found drawn up on opposite sides of dinner-tables, in the shade of their own loftiness, staring at the other side of the way with the dullness of the houses” with a rating and help us compile the very best Charles Dickens quotations.

1 Star2 Stars3 Stars4 Stars5 Stars6 Stars7 Stars8 Stars9 Stars10 Stars (No Ratings Yet)
Loading...

 

Related.

If you like this, we think you might also be interested in these quotations:

 

Advertisements

Comments are closed.

Design: KavnMedia

Send this to a friend